A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 888-647-0579 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Who Answers?

What Parents Can Do to Prevent Teenage Alcohol Abuse

Compared to other forms of drug use, teenage alcohol abuse rates have seen a gradual decline over the years, though present-day rates remain quite high. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, as much as 30 percent of teenagers report drinking by the eighth grade with 54 percent reporting at least one drunk episode by the 12th grade.

As hardheaded as teenagers can be, they nonetheless still value parental concern and approval. Parental influence, the approach parents take and last, but not least, real-time parent behaviors can go a long way towards preventing teenage alcohol abuse.

Parental Influences

teenage drinking

Talking to your teen about the dangers of alcohol abuse can go a long way.

It may surprise some parents to know that teenagers expect a certain amount of input from parents depending on the issue at hand.

  • 19 percent of teens expect parents to have a say about their musical preferences
  • 26 percent of teens expect parents to have a say about their clothing choices
  • 80 percent of teens expect their parents to have a say on whether they should or shouldn’t drink alcohol

On the flipside, the likelihood a teen will engage in excessive drinking increases fourfold for teens who feel parents should have no authority over their drinking behavior. In this instance, parental authority (or the lack thereof) becomes the central issue.

In effect, parental influences can have a bearing on teenage alcohol abuse behaviors provided parents communicate their expectations on some level.

Parenting Approach

Parenting approach has to do with how parents interact and communicate with their teens. In turn, the type of parenting approach used forms the basis for how teens learn to solve problems and manage their emotions.

A combination of discipline and support provides the healthiest environment for teens to develop. Stated rules and firm consequences combined with support of teen accomplishments gives teenagers the tools needed to handle life choices in a responsible manner.

When all is said and done, a consistent parenting approach that employs discipline and support offers the best means for reducing the likelihood of teenage alcohol abuse.

Parent Behaviors

The old adage, “Do as I say, not as I do” won’t go very far when it comes to preventing your child from engaging in teenage alcohol abuse. With all the mixed messages teenagers contend with on a daily basis, mixed messages from parents do more harm than good.

Excessive drinking in front of teens or allowing teenage drinking in the home inevitably plants the seeds for teenage alcohol abuse to develop. In other words, “Monkey see, monkey do” is the more likely result.

Communications & Ongoing Monitoring

The risk of teenage alcohol abuse increases considerably when communications between parents and teens is lacking. This entails periodic discussions about alcohol and its effects, especially when life examples provide genuine opportunities for discussion.

Staying in touch with other parents can also reduce the risk of teenage alcohol abuse from taking root in your teen’s life. When teens do break the rules, following through on stated consequences is essential to getting the message across.

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Alcoholic turns to faith for help

John Baker is a quiet, unassuming man. When he says he deserves no credit for starting Celebrate Recovery, a Christian 12-step program now in 12,000 churches, he means it. Baker, who is in Tulsa this weekend for a Celebrate Recovery leadership training seminar, was raised in a Christian home and said he accepted Christ when….

Continue reading

Alcohol abuse kills thousands in Britain every year

An influential committee of British MPs has criticized successive governments for allowing Britain to develop a drinking habit that is killing tens of thousands of people every year. “Over the last 60 years drinking habits have been transformed. In 1947 the nation consumed 3.5 liters of pure alcohol per head: The current figure is 9.5….

Continue reading

Quaker faith helps alcoholic to quit drinking

A recovered alcoholic from Maldon said he has his Quaker faith to thank for helping him stay alive. Anthony told BBC Essex’s Ian Wyatt he started to drink when he was 20, shortly after joining the Air Force. Having had a religious upbringing as a Pentecostalist, he had never previously drank or smoked. After 25….

Continue reading

Alcohol is a choice, not a disease.

I started drinking in Denver, Colorado back in the fifties when the drinking age for 3.2 beer was eighteen and there were quite a few 3.2 Bars in Denver. I loved the bar atmosphere where one could let go of their inhibitions and watch others do the same. My particular interest at that time were….

Continue reading

Moving on: a life after alcohol

Caroline knew she’d reached the pits of despair as an alcoholic when her mother threatened to disown her. Downing five bottles of wine each night was par for the course – and she had no hope and no job. The Whitstable woman’s battle to stay sober is now fought a day at a time. Caroline….

Continue reading

Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Calls to any general helpline will be answered or returned by one of the treatment providers listed, each of which is a paid advertiser.

By calling the helpline you agree to the terms of use. We do not receive any commission or fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a caller chooses. There is no obligation to enter treatment.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 888-647-0579Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?