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5 Ways to Make the Most Out of Alcohol Abuse Treatment

The decision to get needed alcohol abuse treatment often comes with more than a few concerns and doubts. No doubt, the alcohol-affected state of mind a person reaches by the time he or she considers getting treatment doesn’t make the process any easier.

Of all the types of addiction treatment available, alcohol abuse treatment carries a relatively favorable success rate. According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, alcohol abuse treatment has a 50 to 60 percent success rate provided a person follows treatment guidelines.

As with all things difficult, a few helpful tips can go a long way towards making the recovery process as easy as it can be.

Here are five ways to make the most out of alcohol abuse treatment:

1. Attitude = Motivation

alcoholism recovery

Really participating in treatment and having a positive attitude can help your alcohol addiction recovery.

A person’s attitude towards the treatment process will inevitably influence how motivated he or she will be to get well. Going through detox withdrawals and working through painful aspects of your life will likely be difficult to endure. Likewise, confronting this dark side of self can be a scary process.

With each passing day, a person’s attitude shapes his or her motivation to get well. Maintaining a good attitude means focusing on the positive aspects of the process, rather than the difficulties and challenges that lie ahead.

2. Daily Expectations

Alcohol abuse treatment has more to do with the “process” involved with getting and staying sober rather than the idea of living an alcohol-free life. The effects of alcohol gradually take over a person’s life, first altering brain functions, warping thought processes and ultimately driving unhealthy behaviors.

Pressure-filled expectations can only work against a person’s progress in recovery. Having daily, as opposed to long-term expectations is not only realistic, but also a necessary part of the treatment process.

3. Choosing an Alcohol Abuse Treatment Program

While alcohol exerts the same physical effects on any one person’s brain and body functions, individual circumstances and needs influence how alcoholism plays out in his or her life. In effect, choosing the right alcohol abuse treatment program becomes just as important as making it through the treatment process.

Effective treatment programs employ a comprehensive assessment process to determine a person’s individual treatment needs. This information provides the basis for his or her treatment throughout the program.

4. Build a Support Network

Alcoholism’s effects on a person’s brain, thoughts and behaviors inevitably create its own alcohol-centered lifestyle made up of friends, places and activities. In order to make long-term sobriety possible, recovering alcoholics must replace the old lifestyle with a sobriety-centered lifestyle.

Building a support network throughout the alcohol abuse treatment process is an essential part of the recovery process. Over time, peers, treatment specialists and sponsors can become needed guiding lights on the recovery path.

5. Settle In for the Long Haul

Once the brain becomes addicted to alcohol, drinkers remain susceptible to the drug for the rest of their lives. According to the University of Maryland, alcohol creates a disease-like environment that persists much like any other type of disease.

Making the decision to enter into alcohol abuse treatment for the long-term can go a long way towards reducing the likelihood of relapse.

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