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How an Intervention Can Help Your Loved One into a Drug Abuse Program

Once addiction takes hold in a person’s life, those closest to the addict often feel powerless to help. Attempts to reason or confront your loved one may well be met with anger and hostility at every turn. Without some form of intervention, your loved one may likely continue on in a downward spiral as drugs continue to exert control over his or her life.

A coordinated drug intervention may be the best and only way to help a loved one agree to enter a drug abuse program. Rather than “ganging up” on the addict, interventions specifically address the damaging effects of drugs in a loved one’s life as well as the effects had in the lives of those closest to him or her.

Though getting a loved one into drug abuse treatment remains the ultimate goal for staging an intervention, the outcome will nonetheless require some degree of change in the addict’s life, even in cases where he or she refuses to get needed drug abuse treatment help.

The Goals of an Intervention

intervening to help a loved one

In some cases, an intervention may be the needed step to get your loved one the help they need.

All roads lead back to getting and using drugs within the mind of the addict. Over time, addiction reroutes a person’s thinking processes, priorities and motivations. For some people, a devastating crisis or trauma opens their eyes to the effects of their addiction. For others, problems with the law make drug abuse treatment an inevitable option. Without some type of intervention, an addict may well never choose to enter drug abuse treatment.

In essence, the goal of a drug intervention is to help a loved one actually see the damaging effects of their actions. In addition, the addict must be held accountable for his or her actions in one form or another. Agreeing to enter drug abuse treatment is one form of accountability. Living with the consequences of not entering treatment is another.

Accountability

While agreeing to get needed treatment help remains the overall goal, loved ones who refuse to enter drug abuse treatment must still experience the consequences of that decision in order for any real growth or change to take place.

As addiction not only harms the addict, but those closest to him or her, the people participating in an intervention have a stake in seeing your loved one get better. Likewise, each participant must hold the addict accountable for refusing needed treatment help, according to the Indiana Prevention Resource Center.

With each participant setting and enforcing consequences, your loved one can come to understand how his or her actions have affected other peoples’ lives. For some addicts, this is a necessary first step towards getting them to seek help.

Considerations

A drug intervention meeting requires a considerable amount of pre-planning to ensure your loved one gains a better understanding of the damage caused by his or her addiction. While it is possible to conduct a productive intervention meeting on your own, hiring an intervention specialist can help ensure the best possible outcome for the meeting.

As interventions often bring out strong emotions in the addict as well as the participants, the risk of losing control of the meeting increases when a loved suffers from especially severe conditions. In cases where a loved one also has a mental health problem or has a chronic history of drug abuse, an intervention specialist may well be warranted.

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