A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

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Finding Help for Prescription Drug Abuse

Prescription drug abuse is no longer a problem that only a certain generation or age group faces; rather it has become an epidemic, touching people of all walks of life. Many of the commonly abused prescription drugs are those that are prescribed for many health issues as well as recovery from those issues.

Prescription drug abuse is the third most common method of substance abuse by those of the age of 14 and older, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Prescription drugs like vicodin, OxyContin, Demerol, Valium, Xanax, Adderall and others prescribed by doctors as helpful have for many become damaging.

When Do I Need Help?

For many, understanding that there is a problem is one of the hardest steps to identify. They may have started the medication to help with another health issue like depression or overcoming post operative pain and find themselves unable to let go of those prescription drugs. The National Institute on Drug Abuse defines prescription drug abuse as the intentional use of a medication without a prescription, for the feeling it causes, or in a way other than is prescribed.

Typically, the best way to know if or when you need help is when the prescription drug is affecting your life: causing issues at work, at home, in school, or with those close to you.

Where Do I Start?

dangers of prescription drugs

Prescription drugs, especially opiates, are highly addictive. Treatment can help you stop using them!

Finding help for prescription drug abuse doesn’t have to be hard. There are thousands of resources available if you know where to begin. Once you know you have a problem, you should immediately start reaching out to those around you for support. Family members, friends, religious or spiritual community members, or even other recovering addicts can help you. Many times these people in your life have already done all of the research and are just waiting for the time when you’re ready to start on the road to recovery.

What about Doctors?

For many, support from friends and family simply isn’t enough to help them break their habit; they need help from medical professionals. Thankfully there are many doctors who specialize in prescription drug abuse, even so much as focusing on one particular group of drugs. A specialist will be able to provide a preliminary diagnosis and be able to provide plenty of references on rehabilitation and treatment facilities that are available.

What about Time and Cost?

Many people suffering from prescription drug addictions are working professionals who may have limited time or income. Prescription drug treatment comes in many forms, from rehabilitation centers where a patient will live on site or outpatient treatment where a person will make several meetings a week with doctors and therapists in order to help battle their addiction.

How Long Will It Take?

Once you decide you’re ready to start fighting your addiction, you’ve already overcome one of the highest hurdles in the process. By taking the time to identify the prescription drug you’re addicted to and finding the right professional to work with, breaking your addiction will only be a matter of time. Depending on the drug, the length and intensity of the abuse period, and your own body, rehabilitation times will vary.

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Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) could be forwarded to SAMHSA or a verified treatment provider. Calls are routed based on availability and geographic location.

The TreatmentCenters.com helpline is free, private, and confidential. There is no obligation to enter treatment. In some cases, TreatmentCenters.com could charge a small cost per call, to a licensed treatment center, a paid advertiser, this allows TreatmentCenters.com to offer free resources and information to those in need. We do not receive any commission or fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a caller chooses.

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