A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Who Answers?

Alcoholic turns to faith for help

John Baker is a quiet, unassuming man.

When he says he deserves no credit for starting Celebrate Recovery, a Christian 12-step program now in 12,000 churches, he means it.

Baker, who is in Tulsa this weekend for a Celebrate Recovery leadership training seminar, was raised in a Christian home and said he accepted Christ when he was 13 years old.

But he never felt he measured up to the expectations of his parents, his teachers, his classmates.

That feeling of pain and emptiness ended when he took his first drink at a fraternity house at the University of Missouri.

“For the first time, I felt like I really fit in,” he said.

Baker continued to drink regularly as he married his college sweetheart, began his career and started raising a family.

By his mid-30s, he was “really addicted” and could no longer choose not to drink, he said.

He was never arrested for drunken driving, and never lost a job over it, but his addiction ruined his marriage.

By age 40, his wife, Cheryl, was gone, and he hit bottom.

He turned to Alcoholics Anonymous, stopped drinking and began to attend Saddleback Church, a large Baptist church that met in a gymnasium near his home in California.

Five months later, he and Cheryl renewed their wedding vows.

But Baker had difficulty fitting in with the men’s group at the church. The group didn’t want to hear about his alcohol problems, and he also felt uncomfortable at Alcoholics Anonymous, which was not openly Christian.

“There was never any doubt that my higher power was Jesus Christ,” he said.

He said he felt compelled to develop a plan for a Christian 12-step program and spent six weeks putting the vision on paper, 13 pages, single-spaced.

He took it to his pastor, Rick Warren, who said, “Great, John. You do it.”

On Nov. 21, 1991, he held the first Celebrate Recovery meeting in a gym at a psychiatric hospital. Forty-three people came.

The group grew over the next three years, as Baker wrote curricula for it, and another group started in Santa Cruz, Calif. A third group started in Austin, Texas.

From there, Celebrate Recovery grew into an international ministry, with 12,000 churches in the U.S. The curriculum has been published in 19 languages.

Baker went on staff at Saddleback and eventually devoted all his time to Celebrate Recovery.

The ministry will get another huge boost in August when Reader’s Digest devotes its “Purpose Driven Connection” publication to Baker’s book, “Life’s Healing Choices.”

Baker said he thinks Celebrate Recovery has taken off because it offers a solution not just to addictions, but to the “hurts, habits and hangups” that all people struggle with.

Only about a third of participants have drug and alcohol problems.

“It’s Bible-based, not addiction-based,” he said.

And he takes no credit for its success.

“This is all God and very little John Baker,” he said.

“I truly believe that if I had not surrendered to it, someone else would have done it. This is God’s project.”

source: Tulsa World

More Treatment & Detox Articles

EnterHealth

Enterhealth Introduces Advanced Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Treatment, Opens Life Recovery Center Enterhealth’s program includes continuous online support Dallas, Texas – A new, advanced approach to treating alcohol and drug addiction will become available next week to a nation- and world-wide clientele with the opening of the Enterhealth Life Recovery Center, located near Dallas…..

Continue reading

Drug Rehabilitation or Revolving Door?

Their first love might be the rum or vodka or gin and juice that is going around the bonfire. Or maybe the smoke, the potent marijuana that grows in the misted hills here like moss on a wet stone. But it hardly matters. Here as elsewhere in the country, some users start early, fall fast….

Continue reading

Canadians spend millions drinking just to sleep

Canadians are spending hundreds of millions of dollars every year self-medicating their insomnia with alcohol, a new study suggests. “We were very surprised to see that so many people use alcohol as a way to promote sleep, particularly because it has more detrimental than beneficial effects on sleep,” says Charles Morin, a professor of psychology….

Continue reading

10 Consequences of Cocaine Abuse

cocaine addiction effects and consequences

About Cocaine According to the Center for Substance Abuse Research, cocaine is a highly addictive and a commonly abused illegal drug. Cocaine is a stimulant, and is currently a Schedule II substance. Stimulant drugs heighten a user’s body’s activity, including increasing their energy, alertness, heart rate, and blood pressure. The most commonly used form of….

Continue reading

No booze, less trash at beaches

It was a sight that stunned early-morning surfers and left environmentalists in disbelief. For the first time in memory, San Diego-area beaches didn’t look like a dump the morning after Independence Day. With alcohol banned at most county beaches this year, Fourth of July festivities were milder, family-friendly affairs up and down the coast. And….

Continue reading

Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) could be forwarded to SAMHSA or a verified treatment provider. Calls are routed based on availability and geographic location.

The TreatmentCenters.com helpline is free, private, and confidential. There is no obligation to enter treatment. In some cases, TreatmentCenters.com could charge a small cost per call, to a licensed treatment center, a paid advertiser, this allows TreatmentCenters.com to offer free resources and information to those in need. We do not receive any commission or fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a caller chooses.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 800-580-9104Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?