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Key Questions to Ask When Choosing Between Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers

Many people who suffer from a drug or alcohol addiction also suffer from a mental illness. According to www.nami.org, it is generally agreed that as much as 50 percent of the mentally ill population also has a substance abuse problem. The drug most commonly used is alcohol, followed by marijuana and cocaine. Prescription drugs such as tranquilizers and sleeping medicines may also be abused.

Dual diagnosis treatment centers focus on providing patients help with both their mental illness and their substance abuse problem.

How Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers Help

you can overcome

Asking yourself these questions can ensure that you get the help you need.

It is not beneficial to people when they receive help for a substance abuse problem, such as alcohol, but do not receive help for their mental illness, such as depression, because one problem has been found to lead to the other.

At dual diagnosis treatment centers they evaluate the patient and determine which mental illnesses the individual is suffering from as well as the impact it is having on the substance abuse issue that the person is dealing with. They will then treat each problem, usually first dealing with the person’s drug or alcohol addiction while using treatment that will not heavily impact the person’s mental illness. Once a person has detoxed from their drug of choice they will then work on helping the person with their mental illness by utilizing the proper treatment methods for the person.

Questions to Ask When Choosing a Dual Diagnosis Treatment Center

Do you know if you have a mental illness? Due to the impact that drugs can have on your brain, including alcohol, you may feel as though you are not mentally right, but before admitting yourself into a dual diagnosis program that focuses on a particular mental illness, you should be sure of the mental illness that you have by getting a professional opinion.

Do you use drugs to help deal with your mental illness? It is different for a person who uses drugs to stop the turmoil that comes from a mental illness, such as drinking to not feel depressed, then it is for a person who has a developed a mental illness from their drug or alcohol addiction , such as anxiety. This is important information to let a treatment center know.

Do you want to seek treatment locally? There are numerous dual diagnosis treatment centers available and you should decide if you wish to get treatment locally due to a job, family, and friends, or if you wish to have treatment completely private from your life.

How much money are you willing to spend? Cost for treatment can be expensive and you should determine a cost that you know will not burden you financially before finding a treatment center. If you have insurance you may want to check with your insurance provider to see if they will cover any of your treatment costs.

Dual diagnosis treatment centers are important for you to be aware of being that they are the best option for you if you have both a mental illness and a drug or alcohol addiction. According to www.nami.org, those who struggle both with serious mental illness and substance abuse face problems of enormous proportions. By receiving treatment for both ailments you will have a better chance of living a drug free life.

Dual diagnosis treatment centers focus on providing patients help with both their mental illness and their substance abuse problem.

How Dual Diagnosis Treatment Centers Help

It is not beneficial to people when they receive help for a substance abuse problem, such as alcohol, but do not receive help for their mental illness, such as depression, because one problem has been found to lead to the other.

At dual diagnosis treatment centers they evaluate the patient and determine which mental illnesses the individual is suffering from as well as the impact it is having on the substance abuse issue that the person is dealing with. They will then treat each problem, usually first dealing with the person’s drug or alcohol addiction while using treatment that will not heavily impact the person’s mental illness. Once a person has detoxed from their drug of choice they will then work on helping the person with their mental illness by utilizing the proper treatment methods for the person.

Questions to Ask When Choosing a Dual Diagnosis Treatment Center

Do you know if you have a mental illness? Due to the impact that drugs can have on your brain, including alcohol, you may feel as though you are not mentally right, but before admitting yourself into a dual diagnosis program that focuses on a particular mental illness, you should be sure of the mental illness that you have by getting a professional opinion.

Do you use drugs to help deal with your mental illness? It is different for a person who uses drugs to stop the turmoil that comes from a mental illness, such as drinking to not feel depressed, then it is for a person who has a developed a mental illness from their drug or alcohol addiction , such as anxiety. This is important information to let a treatment center know.

Do you want to seek treatment locally? There are numerous dual diagnosis treatment centers available and you should decide if you wish to get treatment locally due to a job, family, and friends, or if you wish to have treatment completely private from your life.

How much money are you willing to spend? Cost for treatment can be expensive and you should determine a cost that you know will not burden you financially before finding a treatment center. If you have insurance you may want to check with your insurance provider to see if they will cover any of your treatment costs.

Dual diagnosis treatment centers are important for you to be aware of being that they are the best option for you if you have both a mental illness and a drug or alcohol addiction. According to www.nami.org, those who struggle both with serious mental illness and substance abuse face problems of enormous proportions. By receiving treatment for both ailments you will have a better chance of living a drug free life.

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