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Effects of Cognitive Therapy in Treatment Centers

Treatment centers focus much of the time that addicts spend in recovery on helping them to heal psychologically. Psychological counseling in treatment centers takes many forms but for most, it is this counseling that is most effective at helping individuals to really overcome addiction and make a full recovery. Cognitive therapy is one of the types of counseling and treatment that is provided at treatment centers. Here’s a look at the effects that cognitive therapy have on individuals in treatment.

When an addict is using, the addiction takes over and can cause many different problems or concerns. Life the way it once was, family relationships and everything in between is essentially lost. Cognitive therapy helps addicts overcome many aspects of the psychological conditions that are affecting them. The most common type of cognitive therapy used in drug treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of therapy that focuses on changing the behaviors that result from certain thought processes. This type of therapy is very common when treating various types of anxiety that also occur as a result of addiction or which were present prior to an addiction. Cognitive behavioral therapy teaches the patient how to cope with addiction and the feelings that result.

Cognitive behavioral therapy allows recovering addicts to take control of their addiction and their recovery in an effective manner. During cognitive behavioral therapy, patients are encouraged to take control and are empowered to make a full recovery—mentally and physically.

If you or someone you know is addicted to drugs or alcohol, cognitive therapy in treatment can be a very effective form of treatment that will help you overcome a range of conditions and addictions. For help finding a treatment center that can provide effective cognitive therapy and help you overcome addiction call 1-888-461-2155 to speak with a Treatment Centers specialist today.

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