A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 888-647-0579 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Who Answers?

Binge drinking a problem for older adults too

Binge drinking is usually seen as a problem of college campuses, but many older adults may be overindulging in alcohol as well, a study published Monday suggests.

Using data from a government survey of nearly 11,000 Americans age 50 and up, researchers found that 23 percent of men between the ages of 50 and 64 admitted to binge drinking in the past month, as did roughly 9 percent of women.

Among adults age 65 and older, more than 14 percent of men and 3 percent of women reported bingeing — defined as having five or more drinks on one occasion, on at least one day in the past month.

Alcohol binges are often considered a problem of youth. One recent government study found that among U.S. college students between the ages of 18 and 24, 45 percent reported a recent drinking binge.

But the new findings, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, show that older adults can be susceptible too.

“We feel that our findings are important to the public health of middle-aged and elderly persons as they point to a potentially unrecognized problem that often ‘flies beneath’ the typical screen for alcohol problems in psychiatry practices,” lead researcher Dr. Dan G.

Blazer, of Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, noted in a written statement.

Blazer and colleague Dr. Li-Tzy Wu based their findings on a national health survey conducted between 2005 and 2006. Along with binge drinking, the survey looked at so-called at-risk drinking — drinking habits that could have negative effects on a person’s health. In this study, that was defined as averaging at least two drinks per day.

Among 50- to 64-year-olds, 19 percent of men and 13 percent of women were at-risk drinkers. The figures among older men and women were 13 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

Binge drinking carries a number of risks, including accidental injuries, violent behavior, neurological damage and blood pressure increases. These hazards, Blazer and Wu write, “clearly present” greater consequences later in life, when people often have chronic health conditions that can be aggravated by heavy drinking.

Yet, the researchers note, most people who binge are not dependent on alcohol, so their problem drinking may go unrecognized.

The message for doctors, Blazer said, is that they should be asking their older patients specifically about binge drinking.

Patients who do report bingeing may also need to be screened for other types of substance abuse, according to the researchers.

In this study, men who reported binge drinking had a higher risk of illegal drug use than men who drank but did not binge, while female binge drinkers had a heightened likelihood of prescription drug abuse.

source: Reuters

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Problems that go with alcohol impact everyone

Kathy vividly remembers the early morning of Oct. 14, 2006. Her husband Jack doesn’t remember a thing. That’s because it was the day their truck was hit head-on by a drunk driver. Along with their 4-year-old granddaughter, they were heading from their home in New Richmond to the family cabin near Superior. They had worked….

Continue reading

Parent notification policies for underage drinking evolve

For years, Virginia Tech had a complicated system for deciding when to let parents know about their underage children’s alcohol-related transgressions. Visits to the hospital or police station warranted immediate notification, but Mom and Dad didn’t have to know about less-serious offenses, such as sneaking a six-pack into the dorm, unless it happened more than….

Continue reading

How much alcohol can you drink before killing yourself?

Police in Little Compton, Rhode Island responded to a call of driving a vehicle without the owner’s consent. The suspect was at his mother’s home. When police arrived at the home, the man, 39-year-old Jonathan M. Holmes was extremely unsteady on his feet, seemingly drunk. On the way to the stationhouse Mr. Holmes slumped over….

Continue reading

Cirrhosis – The silent killer

Cirrhosis Liver

This is the stark image of the silent killer everyone who drinks too much should remember. Shrivelled and lumpy, the liver belongs to someone who has developed advanced cirrhosis. The condition can develop without any noticeable symptoms until the damage to the organ becomes so serious that it is far too late to do anything….

Continue reading

Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Calls to any general helpline will be answered or returned by one of the treatment providers listed, each of which is a paid advertiser: ARK Behavioral Health, Recovery Helpline, Alli Addiction Services.

By calling the helpline you agree to the terms of use. We do not receive any commission or fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a caller chooses. There is no obligation to enter treatment.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 888-647-0579Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?