A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

One-shot feedback session helps problem drinkers

A single brief intervention that gives problem drinkers personalized feedback can help reduce their alcohol use, new research from the Netherlands shows.

Dr. Heleen Riper of the Trimbos Institute in Utrecht and her colleagues looked at 14 studies of such interventions, including a total of 3,682 people. For every eight people who participated, they found, one could be expected to curb their drinking. “Despite the modest effect sizes overall, personalized feedback could have a major health impact at the population level, in view of the high percentage of problem drinkers who potentially could benefit,” they write in the March issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Brief personalized feedback for problem drinkers typically involves asking people about their own alcohol consumption; providing them with information on how much their peers drink, on average; and offering information on the risks of problem drinking and on self-help measures for drinking less, the researchers explain. These interventions can be offered over the Internet or by mail, without a therapist’s guidance.

Nine of the 14 studies were done with college or university students, four included people recruited from the adult population at large, and one was done with employees at their workplace. Six were done by mail, while the rest were done over the Internet.

The analysis showed that eight people would have to undergo the intervention “in order to generate one good clinical outcome,” Riper and her team say. The results are similar to those seen when primary care providers give patients face-to-face advice on reducing alcohol use.

“Brief web-based personalized-feedback interventions appear to be more readily accepted by both young and mature risky drinkers, as the unobtrusive nature of the intervention allays fears of stigmatization and violation of privacy,” the researchers add. “The constant availability of these web-based interventions makes it more convenient to take part.”

More research should be done to determine whether these interventions are indeed cost effective, Riper and her colleagues conclude, and whether they might help people address mental health problems or unhealthy behaviors such as overeating.

source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine

More Treatment & Detox Articles

UK top of European cocaine league

The UK has recorded the highest number of cocaine users in the EU for the fifth year running, a report suggests. Annual figures from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction showed that 7.7% of Britons aged 15-64 had taken cocaine. The Tories accused the government of failing an “entire generation” of young….

Continue reading

Missing the pint

When Nick Kemp took a group of business clients to a rain-affected Headingley Test match he was astonished by what he saw. Having decamped to the pub owing to the lack of cricket, he watched in amazement as his companions proceeded to down a dozen pints of beer each. “I was keeping a tab because….

Continue reading

Opiates and the Brain – How Addiction Happens

addiction science

Opiate addiction develops out of a series of changes that take place inside the brain. Over time, these changes alter the brain’s overall structures and chemical processes. As these alterations take shape, a vicious cycle of opiates and the brain ensues for as long as a person continues to use. According to the U. S…..

Continue reading

First Nations must find ways to curb alcohol use

Alcohol-related deaths among First Nations in B.C. are a staggering five times higher than for other British Columbians, says a prominent First Nations doctor, who argues aboriginal leaders need to start working on an alcohol strategy to save lives. Dr. Evan Adams, aboriginal health physician adviser in the office of the Provincial Health Officer, believes….

Continue reading