A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Alcohol can wreak havoc on health goals

health goals failed

Alcohol can cause your health goals to be pushed to the side.

Sometimes nothing sounds better after a long, hard day than an ice-cold Dos Equis or a glass of pinot noir.

There’s also plenty of research to show that red wine is filled with antioxidants and can increase good cholesterol, while moderate alcohol consumption by men can lead to a decreased risk of heart attack.

So is there any harm in having a few drinks each week, especially if you follow a regular workout program?

“The cons of drinking wine or any type of booze nightly are many,” says Monica Neave, a Tucson-based certified fitness trainer with FreeWorkoutsGuide.com. “If you’re on a fat-loss program, it can mean the difference between getting great results and getting zero results.”

She advises her clients to abstain from alcohol, especially if they are working toward a weight-loss goal.

The truth is, while one glass of wine with dinner may be good for your heart, more than one glass of wine or other alcoholic beverage per night can wreak havoc on your health and fitness goals. Cocktails, especially, are loaded with sugar and calories and bound to nix even the best intentions to hit the gym.

After all, a standard size margarita can have up to 700 calories — more calories than a two-liter bottle of soda, says Christa Jacobo, certified personal trainer and co-owner of Fitness Together at Rita Ranch.

However, if you don’t plan to give up alcohol anytime soon, moderation is key.

The official definition of moderate drinking is no more than two drinks a day for men and no more than one drink per day for women (of the standard serving-size drinks), says Melinda Johnson, a registered dietitian with Nutrition For Slackers and a National Spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Yet, even with moderate drinking, the calories still add up.

A nightly glass of wine will add an average of 100 calories per day to your diet. But multiply that by seven and you get 700 extra calories per week, Neave points out.

“You can’t afford to do this when you are trying to maintain an adequate calorie intake for fat loss,” she says.

Translated into pounds (with 3,500 calories equal to one pound), a nightly glass of wine can amount to an extra 10 pounds gained per year. And that’s if you have the willpower to stick to just one glass per night and ignore the munchies that drinking alcohol often triggers.

Cristina Lopez, 28, realized a few months ago that alcohol was sabotaging her fitness efforts.

“I was going to the gym every day, but I wasn’t seeing results,” she says.

The problem was that she and husband David “were going out a lot and drinking a lot,” and afterward would end up at Jack-in-the-Box ordering jumbo jacks and tacos.

“I thought I could eat and drink whatever I wanted,” she says. “But you really have to pay attention.”

Cristina Lopez switched from high-calorie cocktails to lower-calorie vodka tonics. David Lopez switched to light beer, and both limited themselves to a couple of drinks on weekends. Within two months, “We lost a lot of inches,” Cristina Lopez says.

Lee Dorsey, a registered dietitian who enjoys a dark beer about once a week, says if you are watching your weight and want to indulge, you’re better off eating a 1,000-calorie hamburger than drinking a 1,000-calorie cocktail. At least with the burger, you get protein from the meat and other vitamins from the toppings. The alcohol has no nutritional value.

Personal trainer Jacobo says alcohol also stunts recovery time between workouts, decreases the pace at which your body builds lean muscle and acts as a depressant, slowing bodily functions and the immune system.

“I say, give up drinking altogether,” she says. “Even red wines contain a large amount of calories that are not easily worked off. Yes, they do have heart-healthy effects, but save the headache and calories and have a small dish of mixed berries. They are high in antioxidants and have the same effect as the red wine.”

source:  Star Gazette

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Types of Alcoholism & How Treatment Centers Can Help

treatment helps

Living with an alcoholic can be extremely hard and stressful and being addicted to alcohol can cause both psychological and physical damage to a person’s body. Since alcohol is the number one abused drug in the world there are many people who suffer from alcohol addiction and since alcohol addiction effect millions of Americans, there….

Continue reading

Middle class wine drinkers ‘harming their unborn children

Middle class women who regularly drink a bottle of wine at home with their partner are at ‘high risk’ of having a child with developmental problems, researchers said. In some cases women may damage their unborn child before they even realise they are pregnant, doctors said at a conference. Drinking during pregnancy can cause foetal….

Continue reading

Study links violence to take-away alcohol

US scientists have shown what they say is a direct link between the number of shops selling alcohol in an area and the violence occurring there. The study was conducted in Cincinnati and considered all types of outlet, including bars and restaurants. The more shops selling alcohol in an area, the scientists say, the more….

Continue reading

Is PTSD Causing your Addiction?

Post-traumatic stress disorder

It’s not uncommon for someone to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of a traumatic event in their life and what’s even more common is a subsequent addiction occurring as a result of a desire to self-medicate to overcome this condition. Is PTSD causing your addiction? Many people suffer great tragedy that causes….

Continue reading