A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 888-647-0579 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Who Answers?

‘The big struggle is coping with life’

How can a 16-year-old be an alcoholic? Maybe it’s just a phase. She’s probably had too much to drink at last night’s party and feels miserable. That’s all. Alcoholic is certainly not a word. With thoughts like these flitting through my mind, I catch up with Shriya (name changed); young, confident and pretty, she seems as normal as any teenager. With one exception, she is currently the youngest member of Alcoholics Anonymous’s Bangalore chapter.

With a few superficial introductions past us, I ask her the first question that’s been nagging me: “When did you have your first drink?” Shriya goes back in time to a night about four years ago: “I stole alcohol from my dad’s stash and went up to the terrace and downed it.”

Were you just curious? I inquire. “No, I was mad at my dad because he’s an alcoholic. So through my class 7 and class 8, I drank in the nights. And if my parents found the booze level to have diminished, I’d say I poured it in the sink, because I didn’t want daddy to drink.”

Then came a stint of relative sobriety, where she got back to studying and tried to stay away from drinking, until…”college just sort of brought it all back”, she confesses. But how does Shriya know that she’s different from a normal college-goer who likes to grab a drink once in a while.

“You just know. I am completely aware that I am different from other drinkers. Once you are in college, people drink to socialise, but with me, all my thoughts are about the next drink, I am preoccupied with it.”

She gives a closer view of her fixation: “I go to parties to drink. I always lie to my friends about what drink I am on. If I am on my eighth glass, I’ll say it’s just my third. After drinking, my friends perhaps just go home and sleep, but I have a bottle hiding somewhere. Just so I am not found out at home, I start drinking early on weekends, and a lot of my drinking also happens in my room. There are so many times that I’ve woken up in autos with no memory of how I got there or where the auto is headed. I would have bruises on my body and not know how I got them.”

It is only natural that Shriya’s college life is affected by her addiction. She says that she is crabby and irritable most days, as she’s nursing hangovers. She admits to having walked into class after a shot or two on occasion.

For Shriya, the self-awareness of being an alcoholic came when Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was conducting a workshop in her college. “I first approached them for some help for my father. But I heard one person talking about how he overcame his addiction and I could completely identify with his struggle and hopelessness. It was almost like he was reading my mind. It’s really not about how old you are. When you have that drink in front of you, your equation with it is just the same. The thoughts in your mind and your struggle to not down it are identical.”

Now, as part of the first women-only AA meetings in the city, she says, “A women-only group definitely gives you more freedom to be open. Also there are women from all age groups here. There is a 28-year-old girl in the meetings who has been sober for 11 years now. She quit drinking at 17, and the fact that there are so many people who have been sober for years gives encouragement.”

She also feels that a support group is more likely to relate to your struggle. “The bigger struggle isn’t with a substance, it’s coping with life. You can’t just keep thinking about how not to stop drinking, but also what else to make of your life.”

But does her family know any of her story? “No way! Just to test the waters I told my mother that I had a breezer and she completely freaked out. So it’s not a good idea”, she says, laughing.

For other teenagers struggling like her, she has a word of advice. “The start is to admit you have a problem and ask for help. And that’s exactly what I did,” she says with a wisdom much beyond her years.

source: Daily News & Analysis

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Physical Effects Of Alcohol

Alcoholism – one of the main reasons behind deadly road accidents, assaults and increasing cases of domestic violence – has been deteriorating the life of millions of people across the globe. Alcohol, when consumed, may relax you and give you the feeling of being less anxious, but you should not forget that it has direct….

Continue reading

An Alcoholic’s Savior: God, Belladonna or Both?

In October 1909, Dr. Alexander Lambert boldly announced to a New York Times reporter that he had found a surefire cure for alcoholism and drug addiction. Even more astounding, he stated that the treatment required “less than five days.” The therapy consisted of an odd mixture of belladonna (deadly nightshade), along with the fluid extracts….

Continue reading

Binge culture

During the holiday season many high school seniors sort out their college preferences and work on their college applications. If in the midst of that anxiety-producing process, students and parents ask college officials to comment on the culture of drinking and alcohol abuse on campus, they are likely to be assured that the school upholds….

Continue reading

Homeless alcoholism drains city

The Biggest Little City gained notoriety in a 2006 edition of the New Yorker after two Reno police officers estimated that ignoring one of the city’s homeless chronic alcoholics cost the city more than $1 million over the years. Malcolm Gladwell’s story quoted Reno police officers Patrick O’Bryan and Steve Johns explaining that Murray Barr,….

Continue reading

Teen drinking not going away

Four ordinary kids sat around a table at a local youth center after being posed one simple question. It was the question asked of many in the under-21 crowd, and they gave the same answer given by a majority of their peers. “I drink. I’m not going to lie,” said a 16-year-old. It’s the same….

Continue reading

Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Calls to any general helpline will be answered or returned by one of the treatment providers listed, each of which is a paid advertiser.

By calling the helpline you agree to the terms of use. We do not receive any commission or fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a caller chooses. There is no obligation to enter treatment.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 888-647-0579Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?