A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Who Answers?

Questionnaire helps students evaluate drinking habits

TORONTO – Laura Adamarczuk was initially blase when asked to complete an online questionnaire to evaluate her drinking habits.

The survey was compulsory for residence dons at the University of Western Ontario, but the 21-year-old felt the exercise had minimal value. A student who went out with friends about twice a week was, after all, perfectly normal.

The results obtained through the online program confirmed her belief that she was not a problem drinker, but still delivered an unpleasant surprise.

“(The survey) shows you how much you spent on alcohol in the past year and what you could have bought instead with that money. It said I could have gone on a vacation or bought a computer,” Adamarczuk said in a telephone interview from London, Ont.

“It’s definitely an eye-opener to make you watch your wallet a little more in terms of what you’re spending for alcohol.”

Such reflections are exactly what the designers of checkyourdrinking.net and other web-based interventions are hoping to inspire in people who may be teetering on the brink of a drinking problem.

The 18-question survey poses straightforward queries about a person’s alcohol consumption, then presents the results in a variety of contexts in an effort to make users understand exactly what impact alcohol is having on their lives.

Participants see how their drinking habits compare to those of others in the same age group, learn how many of their weekly calories have come from a pint or bottle, and receive a detailed breakdown of their total booze budget.

While such programs are prevalent in the U.S., experts lament the dearth of Canadian options, saying web-based interventions can help fill a void in the health system.

They point to recent research conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health which suggests users of the checkyourdrinking.net tool reduced their alcohol intake by about a third in the months after completing the questionnaire.

Online interventions may not be as effective as face-to-face therapy, but can be a timely and cost-effective means of reaching out to those who do not have access to such resources, the study concludes.

Study collaborator Cameron Wild of the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health acknowledges online interventions would have little effect on true alcoholics, but says that population is relatively small.

Such tools are ideally suited to young adults, he says, citing their comfort level with technology as well as their elevated risk for developing problematic drinking habits.

“That group really benefits from this type of approach because they’re interested in safe, relatively anonymous, low potential for stigma opportunities to check out what they’re doing in relation to others,” he said.

“This approach works well for those folks because they haven’t met the criteria for being dependent, but they might be curious about how their drinking stacks up.”

Online interventions could be of particular value in the years following high school when young people generally have more latitude to experiment with their alcohol intake, he added.

Adamarczuk sees a need for such interventions on her university campus, saying many students come in with little sense of their own limitations and minimal understanding of the effects that excessive partying can have on their lives.

She acknowledges that not all students will be willing to confront their potential drinking issues and stresses the program will only be effective for those who are willing to fully embrace it, but says the exercise does have some valuable wisdom to impart.

“You might think that five or 10 drinks is not that big a deal, but when you add it up through the year, that’s when you see the big difference,” she said. “(The tool) is pretty much showing you how the little things add up.”

source: C-Health

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Analysis of alcoholics' brains suggests treatment target

An analysis of brain tissue samples from chronic alcoholics reveals changes that occur at the molecular level in alcohol abuse – and suggests a potential treatment target, according to researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Reporting in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, the scientists said that a protein known as beta-catenin that is….

Continue reading

Treatment of ADHD

ADHD is an “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder”, which greatly affects a child’s ability to concentrate on a particular work, making him impulsive and hyperactive. The ADHD is a common “psychiatric disorder” found in children and if not treated timely then this disorder has long-term effects into the “adolescence and the adulthood” of the child. Therefore,….

Continue reading

Alcohol-free weekend raises awareness

Those who decide to give up alcohol this Easter weekend won’t necessarily be doing so because of holiday tradition. For those involved in the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, it will represent an effort to raise awareness of alcohol disease. The three-day challenge, always the first weekend of April, kicks off the 23rd….

Continue reading

How to recognize alcoholism in your family

Alcoholism is a family disease. If you are living with an alcoholic, whether it is a spouse or a child, your family is dysfunctional. There is much shame associated with alcoholism. It is not fair but there are judgements put on you and your family. Many people think that you should be able to control….

Continue reading

First Nations must find ways to curb alcohol use

Alcohol-related deaths among First Nations in B.C. are a staggering five times higher than for other British Columbians, says a prominent First Nations doctor, who argues aboriginal leaders need to start working on an alcohol strategy to save lives. Dr. Evan Adams, aboriginal health physician adviser in the office of the Provincial Health Officer, believes….

Continue reading

Where do calls go?

Calls to numbers on a specific treatment center listing will be routed to that treatment center. Additional calls will also be forwarded and returned by a quality treatment center within the USA.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by a licensed drug and alcohol rehab facility, a paid advertiser on TreatmentCenters.com.

All calls are private and confidential.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 800-580-9104Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?