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Understanding the Treatment Center Admission Process

All individuals who seek treatment for drug or alcohol addiction will need to go through the admission process at a treatment center when they enter the facility. Although treatment centers have varied procedures for admission, most have a rather standard protocol that includes evaluations and medical assessment as well as an introduction to the staff, counselors and the treatment facility itself. Here’s a look at what to expect during the treatment center admission process.

Admission Procedures at Treatment Centers Include Medical Assessment

When you first enter treatment you will be medically assessed by a doctor or nurse on staff. During the medical assessment you will likely be asked a series of questions about your health both present and past as well as questions about your addiction. It’s important that you answer the medical staff at the treatment center truly and to the best of your ability in order to assure the greatest possible treatment plan. When asked about your level of substance abuse such as how often you use, what you use or how much you use do not lie or try to cover up the situation. It’s important that the medical staff know all about your addiction so that they can specially tailor a treatment plan that will be most effective for you.

Drug Treatment Center Admission Guidelines

So what are the guidelines to actually being admitted into a drug treatment program? First of all, in order to be admitted into drug treatment you have to be at least 18 years old. If you are not 18 years old then you are not old enough to make your own decisions and therefore your parent or guardian will have to admit you to treatment. Also, for teens or those under 18 years old, the treatment will take place in a teen or adolescent treatment center not a standard adult treatment center.

In order to be admitted to treatment you will have to be chemically dependent on drugs or alcohol or both. If you are not dependent on a substance or are not addicted then you have no physical need for treatment in a drug or alcohol treatment center and therefore will not be admitted. Additionally, you have to have a physical desire to get help. Although some treatment centers will admit those who do not want to be there, most require you to at least have some motivation and will to seek sobriety.

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