A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Recent study finds men more likely to become alcoholics

A recent study in Lancet Medical Journal says men are twice as likely as women to become alcoholics.

Casual drinking may lead to something more serious. A study released this month shines a light on the risks of alcohol abuse, especially among those with a “Y” chromosome. The report says men are twice more likely than women to be susceptible to the disease.

“The very first time I drank, I lived with my biological father, and I went to kindergarten, the very first day of kindergarten, drunk off a screwdriver,” said Casey-Jack Kitos.

The study published in the Lancet Medical Journal says men like Casey-Jack have a 20 percent risk of becoming alcoholics, whereas women have an 8-10 percent chance.

“Society has an influence on that, in the way we portray men using substances. The need to be macho, and the advertising showing alcoholism or alcohol in general and many other substances in association with being manly,” said Jess Bartlett, a substance abuse counselor at DCCCA in Lawrence.

The report links drinking habits with genetics and metabolism rate. In general, men can consume more beverages before feeling the effects. Regardless of the cause, the effects can be devastating.

“Alcoholism or addiction in general — it becomes an addiction when it becomes problematic and the individual cannot spot despite the consequences,” Bartlett said.

Kitos said he went to detox, after he lost everything, “I’ve heard some people say you don’t lose a lot when you start drinking — but I lost my home, my job, my fiancé, my baby. I lost everything that I ever worked for.”

The report said the earlier a person starts drinking away from home, the more susceptible they are to alcoholism.

At DCCCA, Bartlett said they help patients in recovery in a number of ways. “We encourage clients to identify their strengths so they can utilize those strengths and find ways to stop the addiction.”

source: Lawrence Journal World

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Teen alcoholic tells of battle with the bottle

Jesse is 23-years-old and should be able to have a beer with his mates. Instead he is an alcoholic. After leaving school at 16 to take up a chef apprenticeship, he began regularly drinking with his older work mates, then slowly watched his life spiral out of control as he went on three or four….

Continue reading

Warning to baby boomers about drinking in older age

A recent report into alcohol and older people has suggested that our growing aging population, and its often increasing dependency on alcohol, could be a “demographic time bomb”. Specialists in health and older people at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh are calling for particular attention to be paid to problems associated with drinking in later life…..

Continue reading

Hooked on prescription drugs

prescription drugs addiction

What happened to Michael Jackson was heartbreaking. I think that he was frightened all his life and took prescription drugs to deal with it. I did the same. I was addicted to an anti-anxiety drug — as was Jackson, reportedly — and they can be more addictive and harder to come off than heroin. Why….

Continue reading

Effects of binge drinking linger

Heavy drinking adversely affects a person’s performance and perception hours after alcohol has left the body, researchers in Rhode Island said. Researchers at Brown University recruited 95 healthy adults ages 21 to 35 who had reported having a hangover at least one time within the month before the research began. The participants were randomly assigned….

Continue reading

Alcoholism: What you might not know

Concerns about alcohol abuse have been making headlines this week. A woman who drinks two glasses of wine every day is at risk for developing liver trouble, a doctor says. A woman who drinks two glasses of wine every day is at risk for developing liver trouble, a doctor says. First, the Indian state of….

Continue reading