A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Anti-smoking drug may curb drinking too

The anti-smoking drug Chantix may also be able to help problem drinkers cut down on alcohol, a preliminary study suggests.

In a study of 20 smokers who were also heavy drinkers, Yale University researchers found that those who took Chantix for one week became less interested in drinking.

They reported less craving for alcohol, and when given the chance to have a few drinks in the laboratory setting, they opted to drink less than their counterparts who’d been given a placebo.

The findings are published online in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Chantix, known generically as varenicline, was approved in 2006 to help smokers quit their habit. It works by acting on a brain receptor for nicotine, blocking some of nicotine’s effects while also creating a nicotine-like “buzz” to curb withdrawal symptoms.

There’s some evidence that alcohol also acts on this brain receptor, raising the possibility that Chantix could help cut heavy drinking — a common problem among smokers.

“A medication such as varenicline, which may target shared biological systems in alcohol and nicotine use, holds promise as a treatment for individuals with both disorders,” Dr. Sherry A. McKee, the lead researcher on the new study, said in a written statement.

For the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, McKee’s team recruited 20 smokers who drank heavily but were not alcoholic. Half of the participants took Chantix for a week, and half were given placebo pills.

The researchers then gave each participant a dose of alcohol in the lab to see what their responses would be. Afterward, the men and women were allowed to have up to eight alcoholic drinks if they chose.

In general, McKee’s team found, the Chantix group reported less alcohol craving and less of a “high” following the initial alcohol dose. And when given the chance to drink more, Chantix users had less than one drink, on average, compared with the placebo group’s two to three drinks.

Eighty percent of the Chantix group chose not to drink at all, whereas only 30 percent of the placebo made the same decision, the researchers found.

“We anticipate that the results of this preliminary study will trigger clinical trials of varenicline as a primary treatment for alcohol use disorders, and as a potential dual treatment for alcohol and tobacco use disorders,” McKee said.

There were no serious side effects among Chantix users, according to the researchers.

There have, however, been safety concerns raised about the drug since its approval, including reports of suicidal thoughts and behavior in some Chantix users. After a review of those reports last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration called on Chantix maker Pfizer Inc. to boost the prominence of the drug’s label warnings.

source: Reuters

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Drink misuse ‘costs each Scot GBP900’

The impact of Scotland’s drink culture on the health service was laid bare yesterday when it emerged that the cost of treating only one person with a moderately severe alcohol-related head injury is more than £34,000. The extraordinary figure was released by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Scotland’s biggest health board. The sum covers only….

Continue reading

What are the Best Alcohol Treatment Centers for Women?

More than 23.5 million people in the United States have had a problem with drugs or alcohol. Seven percent of those people are women. The United States has tens of thousands of facilities that are equipped to take care of the treatment needs of these women. When so many facilities are open and available to….

Continue reading

The Threads of Addiction

Many people have features of an addictive personality. They heed the call to the “pleasure center,” located in the frontal lobe of the brain. As many individuals yield to the urges and cravings of the pleasure center, negative beliefs and behaviors reinforce the need to continue self-defeating addictive patterns. Beneath the addiction, one finds personality….

Continue reading

Drinking without thinking

This past Saturday marked the one year anniversary of the death of University student Jordan Shirey. The cause of his death: alcohol poisoning. It was his 21st birthday. The tragedy did not result in any change to University policy, but binge drinking still remains a hot button issue within the University community. “Our policy is….

Continue reading

Anchorage motel could house chronic alcoholics

The Anchorage division of RuralCap is negotiating to buy a Red Roof Inn at Fifth Avenue and Karluk Street. The agency is seeking a state grant through the Alaska Housing Finance Corp. The Anchorage Daily News reported Monday the effort would follow a housing program in Seattle that does not require residents to stop drinking…..

Continue reading