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Who does what in a cancer treatment program?

Cancer treatments are very complicated. Every treatment largely depends on the type of cancer and its stage and its side effects on the patient. There are various stages involved in the treatment process and therefore there are various professionals and specialists helping the patient, in the treatment process. Given below are some information on who does what in a cancer treatment program.

Many times, the family physician is the one to recognize the signs of this disease in their patients. He may refer the patient to an oncologist who is a doctor, specialized in cancer treatment. Usually on diagnosing, an oncologist manages the treatment program, but it is likely the family physician takes over once the therapy is completed.

To diagnose the cancer, the surgeon operates on the patient to cut out the all the cancerous tissues as possible. This tissue sample is then sent to a pathologist to examine for the signs of cancer. The laboratory technicians and nurses, help in diagnosing cancer in the patient by drawing sample blood for testing.

On determining cancer, the doctor discusses the various treatment options available for the patient.

For radiotherapy, usually a radiation oncologist administers this therapy in the patient. The radio oncologists is often assisted by diagnostic radiologists, radiotherapy technologists and radiation physicists, that together plan the treatment process, check the radiation dosages according to the patient’s requirement and ensure that the entire treatment process is carried out safely and successfully.

Most often, oncologists, family physicians and internists, prescribe the favorable medicines, hormones and other drugs to the patient. Nutritionists help in evaluating the diet of the patient. They also help in planning the essential meal for the patient, during and after the cancer treatment process.

The physician therapists help the patient in restoring their ability to move around and toning their muscles, in case of any body changes during the treatment. The pharmacists mix and the complicated medicines for acquiring the correct medicinal dosages, required by the patient. The psychologists, psychotherapists, social workers or counselors help the patient to mentally cope up with the treatment, which is one of the most essential parts of the cancer therapy.

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