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Rapid opiate detox

Regular Opiate intake can lead to physical as well as mental deterioration of an individual. If some pain killers or over-the-counter analgesics are used on a regular basis to relieve the body pain they can have adverse effects on the body leading to several complications. Scientifically detox is a “dietary regimen” or an attempt to “detoxify” to get rid of all the toxics substances from the body. Rapid opiate detox involves a process where in the harmful opiates are removed from the body in a systematic manner. The “opiate detox” that is on carried without medical assistance can lead to further complications in the body.  

The process of “rapid opiate detox” is generally carried on in controlled environment under proper medical guidance. The rapid opiate detox is also commonly known as the ultra rapid opiate detox. The detoxification is carried on with the help of intubations for six hours. The patient is administered with various types of medicines that accelerate his/her metabolism generally under anesthesia. This results in the rapid withdrawal process lasts for nearly 4 to 6 hours. There are several different methods that can be used for the rapid detoxification, one of which is the “Waismann method”, which is very popular.

Opiate addiction is very difficult to treat, but there are several institutions like the treatment centers, that can help these people with “rapid opiate detox”. These institutions provide proper medical care and also help patients lead independent lives sans their dependency on the opiate drugs.

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