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How do You Get a Loved One to Go into Drug Treatment?

Getting a loved one to seek help and accept treatment for a drug addiction can be all but an easy task to complete, especially when the addict thinks that there “isn’t anything wrong.” It’s the telltale sign, the always heard excuse of an addict—there’s nothing wrong, they aren’t addicted, they don’t NEED help, etc. So how do you get a loved one to go into drug treatment when clearly there is SOMETHING wrong, they ARE addicted and they DO NEED HELP?

A few approaches to helping are available. Of course, not every approach will be necessary and not all approaches to getting an addict to go into drug treatment will help for every addiction. Ultimately, trial and error may be required, you might have to make multiple attempts and eventually you will get your loved one to accept that they have a problem and need help. Here’s a look at some of the ways that you may be able to coerce a loved one to seek help for addiction and go into drug treatment.

Talk with Your Loved One About Their Addiction

The first step to getting a loved one to accept help and seek treatment is to talk with them. This may be easier said than done. Often times, an addict will take offense if you confront them about their addiction. They may fight with you, yell or otherwise be offensive about the issue at hand but you can still try. Try not to be demanding but ask that they seek help, explain that you love them and that’s why you are asking them to seek help for their addiction. Be loving and caring when you try to get a loved one to go to drug treatment and if that doesn’t work, consider other options.

Plan an Intervention

If you’ve tried talking with a loved one about getting help for their addiction and they are unwilling to go into drug treatment, consider planning an intervention. There are a few types of interventions that are commonly used to get an individual into drug treatment. The most common way to evoke an intervention is to work with an interventionist who will guide you through the process of getting the loved one to listen and accept the help that is being offered. When planning an intervention, consider every possible reason that the individual will say NO to treatment and make sure that you’ve got rebuttals ready to go. An intervention is similar to selling the drug treatment to the addict. You have to make them feel like they need the product.

If All Else Fails

If you have tried to talk with a loved one about their need for drug treatment and you have tried an intervention and neither has worked there are last resort options. If all else fails and the loved one will not accept treatment, consider the option of having them arrested for their drug use. This may result in the court ordering them into treatment. Another last resort option would be to have them Baker acted for their addiction (not all states have the Baker Act Law but under the Baker Act, an individual who is a threat to themselves or others as a result of addiction will be held and required to get help in a treatment center). The most important thing to remember when trying to get a loved one to get help for their addiction is that you can’t give up hope!

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