A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Co-Occurring Disorders

A Co-Occurring Disorder is condition wherein mental disorder as well as alcohol problems is faced by an individual side by side. This is a condition that occurs very often. It is important to manage one disorder at a time by treating each one simultaneously to get the best possible outcome.

Co-Occurring Disorders are also referred to as dual diagnosis and it is a very common condition that is often left undiagnosed and untreated. It is at times difficult to identify the symptoms of any one disorder from the other one. Because frequently the symptoms of drug abuse like paranoia, extreme anxiety, delusions, depressions hallucinations are similar to that of the mental illness. Treatment for the Co-Occurring Disorders is different for different individuals; there is no one established treatment for the disorder because every individual is unique and complex than the other. Hence, it is important to have a plan of treatment including all the essential components needed by the person at each level of recovery.

It is very crucial to identify and treat the teenagers with Co-Occurring Disorders or who are at risk of the Co-Occurring Disorders to prevent their diminished quality of life. The untreated symptoms cause poor grades, mood swifts, legal problems; inability to get along with others easily, etc. therefore, the earlier is the onset of the treatment for the disorder, he more soon will the rate of recovery achieved. The recovery takes a long time as it is a slow process. During that time in the integrated treatment programs, the individual learns to manage the symptoms of his illness and at the same time improve the quality of his life.

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Expert warns teens and alcohol don’t mix

Tasmanian parents are being warned against allowing their children to drink alcohol. The warning follows a national health insurers’ survey of 1200 adults earlier this year. More than half the Tasmanians interviewed thought it was acceptable for 15 to 17-year-olds to drink at home supervised by their parents. The Director of the Brain and Mind….

Continue reading

Dangers of Prescription Drug Abuse

prescription pills

Prescription drug abuse is steadily worsening because as more pain, anxiety, or attention deficit disorder medications are disbursed for legitimate purposes, many are being diverted to sales on the street for profit. The prescription pill business is big business on the street with a vast amount of collaboration between users, dealers, and doctors. The rapid….

Continue reading

Alcohol Check-In Sees Record Crowd

Drawn by the promise of free water bottles, more than 1,330 students flocked to the Malkin Athletic Center last Friday for National Alcohol Screening Day, marking a record level of participation that rose by almost 40 percent from last year. The annual event, which takes place at hospitals, community centers, and universities around the country,….

Continue reading

Stressed Diggers turning to alcohol on return from front line

ALCOHOL has become the treatment of choice for an unfortunate number of Australian troops left traumatised by their service in East Timor, Afghanistan and Iraq. Taxpayers are now funding rehabilitation and sometimes compensation for their addiction, not to mention attempts to break it, as troops return from mostly dry operations to deal with their problems….

Continue reading

My endless battle with the bottle

Mike (not his real name) started drinking as a teen and found himself drawn into alcoholism. “I started drinking when I was about 15 or 16, but it wasn’t a regular occurrence,” he said. “At university it became more regular, but I didn’t think I had an alcohol problem, and at that point I was….

Continue reading