A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
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Treatment & Detox Guide

Drug Treatment Center Myths and Facts

If you are looking for a drug treatment center that can provide you or a loved one with treatment for any type of drug addiction then chances are you have already fallen victim to the many myths of drug treatment. Unfortunately, there is much confusion that surrounds drug treatment but the myths of drug treatment….

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Alcohol addiction

Addiction is basically the dependence of the body on some physical or psychological need. Addiction can have adverse as well as more favorable results on the body, largely depending on the type of addiction. Today, larger part of the population is alcohol addicted. Alcohol is a liquid, which is derived by the “fermentation” of different….

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Early tipple 'breeds alcoholism'

Parents who introduce their children to alcohol in the hope of encouraging responsible drinking might be doing more harm than good, work suggests. The National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism found drinking before the age of 15 increased a child’s risk of becoming a heavy drinker. A teenager’s fast-developing brain becomes programmed to link….

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Alcoholism in the Jewish community

It’s not easy to be a recovering alcoholic who is also Jewish. It’s hard enough for someone to admit having a problem with alcohol, let alone having to buck long-standing cultural and religions traditions to find sobriety. Helping people overcome these unique challenges is the goal of Jewish Family Service (JFS). With offices located in….

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Abilene universities discourage drinking

An Associated Press analysis of federal records found that 157 college-age people, 18 to 23, drank themselves to death from 1999 through 2005, the most recent year for which figures are available. Over the seven-year span, 83 of the college-age victims were under the drinking age of 21. A separate AP analysis of hundreds of….

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