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Drug testing

drug test

Drug testing is used to help determine if a person is using drugs. 

Drug testing basically involves collecting the urine samples to test the different drugs like cocaine, marijuana, PCP, amphetamines, etc. The teenagers, are especially more vulnerable to drug abuse as their body and brains are still developing. This can lead to adverse effects on his health, body, behavior and brain.

There are number of methods that use the hair, oral fluids, urine and sweat for drug testing. The urine tests are the least expensive ones and are an intrusive method of testing. These methods generally test the panel of drugs. These drug testing methods are almost very accurate, but you cannot say 100%. The samples are generally divided, so there are chances that if the initial test results are positive, in such cases, you can also conduct a confirmation test.

Some schools have also accepted the random testing method and the reasonable suspicion testing. During the random testing method, a random process like that of flipping of a coin is used. Here one or two student from the student population undergoes the test. Reasonable suspicion testing is one where the student has to give a urine sample if there are enough evidences that show the student had used am illicit substance.

Drugs are eventually seen inn the body fluids and the hairs. Even the painkillers taken by you show up in the drug test. They bring about positive results. A particular painkiller may or may not show up in a drug test. This entirely depends upon the ingredients present in the painkiller drug.

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