A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Sight damaged by too much beer

Knocking back four beers a day doesn’t just risk a serious beer gut – it could also be damaging your eyesight, a study of Australian men has found.

Melbourne research shows men in their 60s who drink alcohol heavily are about six times more likely to develop the most debilitating form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

About 15 per cent of Australians are affected by the disease – where sight fades in the centre of the visual field – and one per cent will have the advanced or end-stage form that eventually steals sight.

Smoking and genetics have been linked to the condition but Dr Elaine Chong from the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital decided to study the diet and eye health of almost 7,000 people over a period of time to determine the contribution of alcohol.

“We found that higher levels of alcohol, more than four standard drinks a day, was associated with a three-fold increase in end-stage AMD in men,” Dr Chong said.

Beer drinking, in particular, carried a six-fold increased risk. Quantities of wine and spirits drunk were too low to evaluate their risk.

The same link was not see in women, possibly because they were less likely to drink heavily, she said.

Explaining the trigger, Dr Chong said it was possible alcohol could increase oxidative stress to the retina.

Alcohol is a neurotoxin so it is thought that high levels can actually cause retinal damage that might lead to the disease,” she said.

An earlier study found rats fed alcohol in the lab were more likely to develop signs of end-stage AMD.

While the new findings, presented at an ophthalmology conference in Melbourne today, suggest drinking habits could be contributing, it may not be that clear cut.

“It might be that heavy drinkers were also more likely to smoke, which is a well-identified disease risk,” Dr Chong said.

“But regardless, heavy alcohol intake is harmful so cutting back will always do you good.”

source:  http://www.theage.com.au

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Challenges in Drug Treatment

No matter what you do, no matter how hard you try, there will still be challenges in drug treatment that can cause some bumps in the road. Even the most dedicated, most willing and most ready to get sober individual will find drug treatment to be a challenging process that takes strength to carry on—but….

Continue reading

Bi-polar disorder

The list of disorders is very unending. There are various different disorders that can be contracted by an individual. Most of the disorders largely affect the mental health of the patient. Bi-polar disorder is a similar type of disease affecting a large number of the total population around the world.   Scientifically the Bi-polar disorder is….

Continue reading

Signs Your Loved One May Need Alcohol Addiction Treatment

get help for drinking addiction

Alcohol is the most abused drug in the world, and is the third leading cause of death in America. Alcohol addiction is a disease that plagues millions of Americans, but it is curable through alcohol addiction treatment and through the right therapeutic techniques. Signs your Loved one is Addicted to Alcohol There are different types….

Continue reading

Program is in the works to keep teens away from alcohol

Tarrant County mental health professionals and advocates are drafting a pilot program aimed at treating teens who are slipping into alcoholism. The proposed High School Alcohol Diversion Program, modeled after college programs, would allow teens with alcohol violations to stay at their schools instead of being sent to alternative schools. That would help prevent them….

Continue reading

New Research on the "European" Approach to Teenage Drinking

Should parents allow their teenage children to drink alcohol? Restaurants in Germany can legally sell alcohol to a teenager after his sixteenth birthday, and French children drink wine with dinner in the home starting at an early age. But U.S. parents who try to follow this relaxed European example, believing it fosters a healthier attitude….

Continue reading