A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Overcoming a drink problem

If you think you drink too much, and you are not content with that, then you need to take action.

Nobody can force you to reduce your alcohol intake, or make you seek professional help. The only person who can take responsibility for your drinking is YOU. No one else can change your lifestyle, but here are a few tips to start you on your way:

First, you need to review your lifestyle; identify those times and places when you’re most likely to reach for a drink, or people who make you think of drinks. From the bar after work to the weekend with friends, if you know you’ll be tempted then think about steering clear.

Make an excuse or go but limit yourself. Alternatively, try turning up later than usual, to minimise your drinking time, or kick off with a soft drink to stop you from feeling so thirsty.

You need to drink for the right reasons, not just for the sake of it. Try to associate drinking with celebrations and events, rather than a means of blotting out your problems or propping up your self-confidence.

Also think of alcohol as something you do as a complement to another activity, instead of something you turn to for its own sake.

If you do indulge, pace yourself; binge drinking is dangerous, as your body can only process one unit of alcohol per hour. The more rapidly you drink, the more intense the effects will be, but that doesn’t make the experience any more enjoyable. If you find it hard to apply the booze brakes, try putting your drink down more often.

If it isn’t in your hand all the time, you’re less likely to drink it so quickly. Then try and take a break, play some pool, or leave the bar. Try phoning some old friends for a bit or try phoning somebody at home, since they may remind you of heading home.

It can also help to learn new bar habits. If you’re at the bar with a glass in your hand, try talking more. Use your mouth for something other than boozing and you’re less likely to fall down at the end of the evening.

Getting in something to eat can also have the same stalling effect – though be careful with salty snacks, as it could just stoke your thirst.

And, the old cliche – know your limits. Before you start drinking, be sure you know when to stop. Think of a particular limit.

Decide in your mind that no matter what happens you are not drinking beyond three bottles. This can be hard when everyone else is boozing, but practice makes perfect. It also avoids bad hangovers.

Ideally, though I know it can be hard, try not to exceed the recommended daily intake limits as laid down by the government – two or three units for a woman, three or four for a man.

Try to take a break from your boozing. If you’re worried about drinking, but you don’t fancy quitting completely, then set aside an alcohol-free period every now and then, preferably two days after five boozing days or every Sunday.

It might be one day in a week or a month, but even a temporary hop onto the wagon can be enough to keep the issue alive in your mind.

Ultimately, the more switched on you can be about your alcohol intake the less likely it is that you’ll run into problems. That’s not to say you can’t have fun, but go bowling or to the cinema instead!

If you’re really worried, don’t be afraid to seek help. Facing up to the fact that you may have a drink problem takes guts.

It is perhaps the most courageous step you can take towards regaining control over your life. Help is out there too, from confidential telephone support to face-to-face counseling, and more, but it’s down to you to ask.

source:  Portsmouth Students’ Union

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Parents warned on children’s safety risk from alcohol

Parents in England are being warned not to under-estimate the “dangerous consequences” of under-age drinking. Children’s Secretary Ed Balls says parents worried about their children’s safety should recognise the connection between alcohol and “risky behaviour”. This follows a survey suggesting many parents do not rank drinking alcohol as a serious risk to their children. Mr….

Continue reading

Moderate Drinking Raises Risk Of Hospitalization

New British research suggests that men who consumer just four pints of beer per week may increase their lifetime risk of being hospitalized. In the study of 5,772 Scottish men, researchers found that those who consumed just four pints of beer, eight shots of spirits or eight small glasses of wine per week were more….

Continue reading

When alcohol is the problem in your relationship

What is it about this type of drink that causes people to become attached to it? What is it about alcohol that is so much more difficult to handle than say tea or milk? Could it possibly be that there is the huge possibility of an addiction coming to the surface; an addiction that even….

Continue reading

Tennent’s backs minimum alcohol pricing

Tennent’s, Scotland’s largest brewer, has heaped pressure on Holyrood’s opposition parties by backing the SNP’s plans for minimum alcohol pricing. Mike Lees, the company’s managing director, said the proposals were “a sensible move” and “part of the solution” to the country’s chronic binge drinking problem. But his surprise intervention failed to sway the other three….

Continue reading