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Naltrexone Found to Reduce Alcohol Cravings for Men and Women in Treatment Centers

Alcoholism is a dangerous and deadly condition that affects thousands of Americans resulting in uncontrollable cravings to drink. Recent studies have found that Naltrexone can help to reduce the alcohol cravings that men and women have during alcohol treatment and help to reduce the chance of alcohol relapse. Treatment centers are now able to provide Naltrexone to prevent alcohol cravings during treatment further improving the effects of the treatment programs that are provided.

What is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone is the first ever FDA approved drug that has been found to reduce alcohol cravings and help to prevent relapse. An opioid antagonist, Naltrexone is non-habit forming and will not result in further addiction! This breakthrough medication provides recovering alcoholics with a way to shut down the cravings for alcohol so that they can focus more strongly on psychological recovery.

How is Naltrexone Prescribed?

Treatment centers as well as doctors are able to prescribe Naltrexone for individuals who are in treatment and trying to stop drinking. It is typically prescribed in a pill form that is taken once per day for a period of 3-6 months to help reduce any further cravings for alcohol during the time in which the individual is undergoing treatment for alcoholism.

Are there any Side Effects to Naltrexone?

Most people report very few or no side effects as a result of taking Naltrexone during alcohol treatment. Naltrexone works to eliminate alcohol cravings so most people have reported feeling more at ease during treatment when they are taking the Naltrexone. A small amount of people have reported anxiety, nervousness and minor stomach problems while using Naltrexone but in most cases the symptoms subside rather quickly and are nothing to be concerned about.

Naltrexone is Not a Cure All for Alcoholism

Treatment centers and doctors warn that Naltrexone, although it does curb cravings, is not a cure for alcoholism. This medication should only be taken as prescribed by a medical doctor and in conjunction with an alcohol treatment program that is designed to provide you with the tools and support necessary to recover mentally and physically from alcoholism. While treatment centers can provide Naltrexone as a means of helping to curb cravings and reduce the risk of relapse, alcoholism treatment is only effective when therapy and counseling are also provided to help manage co-occurring conditions such as anxiety, depression, trauma and various other psychological conditions that have resulted from the long term use of alcohol or which were the original cause for the drinking to begin with.

For more information about Naltrexone or for help finding a treatment center that can provide you with effective alcoholism treatment, contact a referral specialist at Treatment Centers .com today by calling 1-888-461-2155.

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