A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Help Young Adults Manage Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has awarded Saint Louis University a grant to develop and test a new program to help older children and young adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD).

The impetus of the program will be to improve transition into adulthood. The new program will focus on teaching important life skills, such as how to cope with new situations and minimize disruptive behaviors that could lead to loss of employment or trouble with the law.

According to Leigh Tenkku, Ph.D., assistant professor of family and community medicine at Saint Louis University, while the effects of FASD are lifelong, currently there are very few support systems in place to help these individuals and their families as they get older.

“The brains of individuals with FASD are not fully developed, which affects their ability to handle emotions, problem solve and pick up on social cues,” Tenkku said.

“As they get older, these problems affect their ability to maintain a job, their relationships and their parenting abilities.”

The new program, called Partners for Success, combines personal mentors and therapeutic home visits to provide one-on-one support similar to the popular Parents as Teachers model, only intensified. The goal of the program is to give individuals with FASD the tools and support necessary to successfully navigate the challenges of adulthood.

“This is a totally new approach to mentoring older children and adults with FASD, but it’s built on well-established research in the field. This program is very promising and we’re hopeful that it will revolutionize the way we support these individuals,” Tenkku said.

Currently in the U.S., there are no social service programs geared to the specific needs of youth and young adults with FASD. Instead, social agencies offer a hodgepodge of programs that address the broader needs of those with developmental disabilities.

In a time of budget cuts and tightening financial belts, Tenkku says one of the most important aspects of the program is that it is financially feasible and easy for other agencies to implement.

“We want our program to be practical and easily replicated by other agencies that provide FASD services. We’re creating the tool, but they have to be able to use it. That’s how we’ll help the greatest number of people,” Tenkku said.

“The overall cost of the program is relatively low. The Partner for Success program is an investment in the future of these individuals. Doing nothing would certainly cost us more in the long run.”
About Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Drinking during pregnancy can lead to serious physical abnormalities, neurological and behavioral problems, all characteristics of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. FASD is the greatest cause of children born with developmental disabilities each year in America even though it is 100 percent preventable.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe form of FASD. Babies born with fetal alcohol syndrome, which is estimated to affect one to two babies born per 1,000, are often born preterm, have low birth weight and long-term growth problems.

During the first year of the Partners for Success study, researchers at Saint Louis University will collaborate with several community partners, including the Family Support Network, to design the program.

At the same time, they will recruit 100 youth and young adults with FASD to participate in the study.

The program will be implemented during the second year. Half of the study participants will be enrolled in the new program, while the other half will continue to receive standard support services.

Participants enrolled in the program will receive biweekly home visits from a licensed clinical social worker. They also will be assigned a mentor who will meet with them weekly to socialize, model appropriate behavior in the community, and help the individuals integrate the techniques taught during home visits, in their daily lives.

During the final year of the study, researchers will follow up with participants to measure the success of the program.

“Of course ultimately we’d like to prevent FASD from occurring. But the sad reality is that 1 percent of children and young adults in our society suffer with the lifelong effects of drinking during pregnancy. It’s imperative that we find better ways to support these individuals,” Tenkku said.

source: St Louis University

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Why drinkers do it all again

Some people drink to forget, but scientists have found that anyone who binge drinks is more likely to forget only the worst experiences of being drunk – which is why alcohol is such an addictive drug. Alcohol has been found to affect memory in a selective manner. Drinking makes it easier to remember the good….

Continue reading

Dual Diagnosis

Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Dual Diagnosis is a condition wherein a person has mental disorder as well as an alcohol problem. This is a condition that occurs very often, particularly with depression, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, Schizophrenia. Many times, the onset of Dual Diagnosis begins with the mental problems and to cope up with it, people use drugs or….

Continue reading

Proteins may point to alcohol use test

Measuring a set of protein changes in the blood linked to alcohol use may potentially lead to a more accurate diagnostic test than those currently available, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. “The challenge in alcohol abuse as opposed to substance abuse — things like cocaine or heroin or PCP — is that….

Continue reading

Web intervention reduced students’ drinking

Heavy drinkers in the study were given an estimate of their peak blood-alcohol concentration. Heavy drinkers in the study were given an estimate of their peak blood-alcohol concentration. University students who received a brief personalized online assessment of their drinking habits reduced their alcohol consumption for at least several months afterward, a recent study by….

Continue reading

How Binge Drinking Affects The Teenage Brain

As children grow, cells in the brain (known as neurons) are constantly making new connections with other cells in the brain. The stronger these neural pathways within the brain become, the more efficiently children can perform new skills. Neural pathways within the brain strengthen whenever new skills are learnt and, to some degree, this process….

Continue reading