A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Finding Help for an Alcohol Use Disorder

If you suspect that you have an alcohol disorder and have had complications due to your alcohol use, it helps to know the trouble signs so you can make a change early. An alcohol use disorder is defined by The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism as a “medical condition that doctors can diagnose when a patient’s drinking causes distress or harm.”

Alcohol use disorders can become complicated and alcoholism changes the way we approach issues by creating havoc in our thought patterns and how we react to circumstances.

Trouble signs for an alcohol use disorder may be indicated by the following:

  • Drinking more or longer than intended.
  • Inability to stop or cut down on drinking.
  • Developed a tolerance where more alcohol is needed to feel the same effects.
  • Had memory blackouts.
  • Continued drinking although it made you anxious or depressed.
  • Given up or cut back on activities that are important to you.
  • Complication in social, family, or work environments.
  • Caused or increased chances of harm to yourself or others while drinking such as driving, having unsafe sex, or using machinery.
  • Had withdrawals when drinking stopped or was reduced.
  • Been arrested or had legal problems because of your alcohol use.

Finding Help for an Alcohol Use Disorder

alcohol abuse help

You can find the help you need to become alcohol free!

Some people are more at risk than others for having an alcohol use disorder and even mild symptoms of abuse can signal the start of an alcohol use disorder. Don’t take chances with your sobriety.

Alcohol use disorders can be overcome. Over time, and with practice, you can change your thought patterns and how you react by participating in an alcohol recovery program. There are many resources and support groups available beyond outpatient or inpatient treatment programs.

You can find the help you need by:

  • Contacting your doctor or local hospital for referrals and information regarding programs in your area.
  • Contacting local support groups that provide 12-Step meeting such as Alcoholics Anonymous.
  • Getting recommendations from family, friends, or others who have participated in an alcohol treatment program.
  • Getting referrals and information from church ministers and clergy
  • Researching and explore various programs online
  • Contacting local outpatient and inpatient treatment programs
  • Contacting The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration online

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Finding Help for Prescription Drug Abuse

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Study: Seattle housing for alcoholics saves money

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Daily alcohol limit ‘unhelpful’

Daily limits on alcohol consumption are meaningless and potentially harmful, experts have warned. The government says men should drink no more than three to four units per day and women no more than two to three. Liver specialist Dr Nick Sheron, of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK, says these limits were devised by civil servants….

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What to Expect in Treatment Centers

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In 2009, as many as 23.5 million Americans needed treatment for alcohol and drug addictions, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Of that number, only 11.2 percent or 2.6 million people actually sought out treatment. When considering the wide range of treatment centers available for both alcohol and drug addictions, anyone suffering from….

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