A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Expert warns teens and alcohol don’t mix

Tasmanian parents are being warned against allowing their children to drink alcohol.

The warning follows a national health insurers’ survey of 1200 adults earlier this year.

More than half the Tasmanians interviewed thought it was acceptable for 15 to 17-year-olds to drink at home supervised by their parents.

The Director of the Brain and Mind Institute in Sydney, Ian Hickie, says parents are misguided in thinking that allowing young people to drink a little at home will help moderate their behaviour with their peers.

“The evidence seems to be in the opposite direction,” he said.

“The younger you start drinking at home, the more likely you are to run into trouble, particularly outside the home, so the two worlds are not really connected.

“What your young people are doing under your supervision won’t help outside the home and probably, in reality, it’s encouraging the idea that alcohol is ok. I mean, your parents give it to you, what could be so wrong about it?”

“The key issue here is the brain is continuing to grow and develop during the late teenage and early adult years and particularly the front part of the brain, that has the most to do with being an adult – making decisions, planning for the future, inhibiting impulsive behaviours – is undergoing very active change.

“Alcohol is toxic to nerve cells, kills off nerve cell connections, and excessive exposure to alcohol during those years therefore might do lasting damage to teenage brains.”

Income link

The study also found people’s acceptance of underage drinking was closely linked to their incomes.

Sixty three per cent of people earning more than $100,000 supported supervised drinking.

The figure for people earning less than $70, 000 was 48 per cent.

Professor Hickie says having money to purchase substances results in using more substances.

“So basically parents have got more resources, have more alcohol they share it with their kids, they just see it as another consumer product,” he said.

“It’s simply an availability at home and therefore an attitudinal issue. Now I’m sure those same parents if they thought it was harmful, wouldn’t actually be so ready to share their alcohol with their kids.”

Age increase

Professor Hickie wants the legal drinking age increased to 19.

“It would make an enormous difference to finishing school,” he said.

“For every year you go up, what you’re really doing is taking the whole population with you. When the legal drinking age was 21 kids started drinking at 18,19,20.

“Now the legal drinking age is 18 we’ve got 14, 15, 16-year-olds regularly abusing alcohol.

New Tasmanian laws introduced last month prohibit the supply of alcohol to people aged under 18 on private property without the permission of their parent or guardian.

Those who do supply alcohol to underage drinkers face fines of up to $12 000 or 12 months’ imprisonment.

source: ABC News

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Low vitamin D heightens breast-cancer mortality rate

Disease twice as likely to spread in women deficient in the nutrient, study finds Women diagnosed with breast cancer are nearly twice as likely to have the disease spread to other parts of their bodies and are 73 per cent more likely to die from it if they have low levels of vitamin D, according….

Continue reading

Recognizing the Signs of Drug Relapse Post Drug Treatment

If you have already completed drug treatment or if someone you love has completed treatment at a treatment center then you probably think that things are perfect, on the right track and can never go back to what they were. Unfortunately, if you aren’t ready to recognize the early warning signs of drug relapse after….

Continue reading

Seizure drug shows promise as potential therapy for alcoholism

A new study conducted on mice has shown that a seizure drug, called gabapentin, could act as a potential therapy for alcoholism by reversing cellular effects. In the study, alcohol-dependent rodents receiving gabapentin drank less alcohol, and this led the scientists to say that gabapentin normalizes the action of certain brain cells altered by chronic….

Continue reading

Alcohol abuse kills thousands in Britain every year

An influential committee of British MPs has criticized successive governments for allowing Britain to develop a drinking habit that is killing tens of thousands of people every year. “Over the last 60 years drinking habits have been transformed. In 1947 the nation consumed 3.5 liters of pure alcohol per head: The current figure is 9.5….

Continue reading

Co-occurring disorders in adolescent girls

“Co-occurring disorders”, as the name suggests, is a disorder, in which the person is affected with dual problems like that of an emotional or psychiatric problem along with drug or alcohol addiction. The “co-occurring disorder” has a great effect on the patients “psychological and physical health”. A large part of the global population is experiencing….

Continue reading