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Exercise ‘does not compensate’ for drinking too much

Sweating off alcohol does not work even though some believe exercise helps you get over a hangover, ministers have said.

Research published by the Department of Health suggests more than 3.8 million adults in England try to exercise to clear a hangover.

A survey by YouGov found that one in five people admit to playing sport to taking exercise to ‘make-up’ for having drunk a lot of alcohol over the past few days.

Public Health Minister Gillian Merron said: “Everyone knows that regularly taking part in physical activity is important for maintaining good health.

“But the truth is, if you have a big night at the pub, you’re not going to compensate with a workout the following day. Damage from regularly drinking too much can slowly creep up and you won’t see it until it’s too late.

“The Government is helping people to understand how much they are drinking through our Know Your Limits campaign.”

Dr Carol Cooper GP and broadcaster said: “Regular exercise is vital for staying healthy, so on the one hand it is encouraging that so many heavy drinkers recognise their drinking habits aren’t good for them, and that they want to make up for it by taking exercise.

“But people need to be aware that regularly drinking double the recommended limits comes with health risks that can’t simply be burned off down the gym, in the pool, or on the football pitch.”

Recommended limits for women are two to three units a day and for men are three to four.

Nicolay Sorensen, Alcohol Concern Director of Policy and Communications, said: “There’s no doubt that alcohol often contains far more calories than you would expect, so if you’re watching your weight it makes sense to bear that in mind as part of your fitness plan.

“But alcohol has its own special set of risk factors – damage to vital organs, increased chance of cancers and so on. No amount of time on the treadmill can reverse the effects of heavy drinking.

“For health conscious drinkers, being fighting fit must include keeping drinking to moderate levels.

source: The Telegraph

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