A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Drinkers’ Red Face May Signal Cancer Risk

People whose faces turn red when they drink alcohol may be facing more than embarrassment. The flushing may indicate an increased risk for a deadly throat cancer, researchers report.

The flushing response, which may be accompanied by nausea and a rapid heartbeat, is caused mainly by an inherited deficiency in an enzyme called ALDH2, a trait shared by more than a third of people of East Asian ancestry — Japanese, Chinese or Koreans. As little as half a bottle of beer can trigger the reaction.

The deficiency results in problems in metabolizing alcohol, leading to an accumulation of a toxin called acetaldehyde in the body. People with two copies of the gene responsible have such unpleasant reactions that they are unable to consume large amounts of alcohol. This aversion actually protects them against the increased risk for cancer.

But those with only one copy can develop a tolerance to acetaldehyde and become heavy drinkers.

“What we’re trying to do here is raise awareness of this risk factor among doctors and their ALDH2-deficient patients,” said Philip J. Brooks, an investigator with the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and an author of the report published Monday in the journal PLoS Medicine. “It’s a pretty serious risk.”

The malignancy, called squamous cell esophageal cancer, is also caused by smoking and can be treated with surgery, but survival rates are low. Even moderate drinking increases the risk, but it rises sharply with heavier consumption. An ALDH2-deficient person who has two beers a day has 6 to 10 times the risk of developing esophageal cancer as a person not deficient in the enzyme.

Reducing drinking can significantly reduce the incidence of this cancer among Asian adults. The researchers calculate that if ALDH2-deficient Japanese men reduced their weekly consumption to fewer than nine drinks, 53 percent of esophageal squamous cell cancers in that group could be prevented.

source: New York Times

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Parents, administrators fight binge drinking

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools have a new program to tackle binge drinking in teens, which seems to start before they head to college, according to a national survey. The survey by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said 18 percent of 12 to 20-year-olds are binge drinkers. The school system is using federal money for….

Continue reading

U study: Too many troops tie one on

Binge drinking in the military is more common than you may think, university study finds. It may come as no surprise to anyone who’s served in the military, but 43 percent of active-duty personnel admit to frequent binge drinking, according to a new study from the University of Minnesota. On average, that means that every….

Continue reading

Side effects of over consumption can be fatal

When it comes to drinking, it seems as though Americans are fond of taking an alcoholic beverage from time to time. In a Gallup Consumption Habits poll, 63 percent of Americans reported that they drink alcohol, while 37 percent reported they abstain. While alcohol is typically not harmful in moderation, and can actually be beneficial….

Continue reading

Youth Alcohol Binges on the Rise, Health Expert Warns

It’s time for Seventh-day Adventists to do more in getting the word out about the dangers of alcohol use and binge drinking among young people, according to DeWitt Williams, health ministries director for the church in North America. Williams points out that the alcohol industry spends a staggering $11 million a day on advertising in….

Continue reading