A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Cure for alcoholism discovered?

Cure for alcoholism

A cure for alcoholism may have been discovered.

An eminent French doctor claims to have identified a ‘miracle’ cure for alcoholism.

In his book titled, Le Dernier Verre [The Last Glass], Dr Olivier Ameisen, claims that he got rid of his habit with the help of drugs, although experts and anti-alcoholism campaigners are sceptical about his claims.

Citing his own case as an example, Dr Ameisen insists that Baclofen drug, commonly used by cystic fibrosis patients or people who are partly or wholly paralysed can effectively help cure excruciating craving for alcohol.

“Mine is the first case in which a course of medicine has completely suppressed alcohol addiction,” The Independent quoted Ameisen as saying.

“Now I can have a glass and it has no effect. Above all, I no longer have that irrepressible need to drink,” he added.

Dr Renaud de Beaurepaire of the Paul-Guiraud hospital at Villejuif near Paris supports Ameisen claims and insists it does work.

“I prescribed it to two alcoholics who were at the end of the road,” he said.

“It was pretty miraculous,” he added.

An article from the New York Times sent to Ameisen by his friend also read how a course of baclofen, given to a patient with muscle problems, had cured his addiction to cocaine.

In March 2002 he prescribed small daily doses of 5mg of baclofen to himself.

“The first effects were a magical muscular relaxation and baby-like sleep,” Ameisen said.

He also found that he was no longer racked by a compelling necessity to drink.

He later increased the dose to 270mg a day and declared himself “cured”. Ameisen still takes 50mg a day.

Xavier Laqueille, head of the St Anne hospital in Paris, which treats addicts, said: “Alcoholism is a complex disease, in which both neuro-biological and psychosocial factors are entwined.”

“Encouraging people to think there is a miracle molecule is to completely misunderstand the nature of alcoholism and extremely irresponsible,” said Dr Michel Reynaud of the Paul-Brousse hospital in Paris.

source:  The London News

More Treatment & Detox Articles

More American women dependent on alcohol: study

Los Angeles, May 10: Alcohol dependence has increased substantially among American women, particularly white and Hispanic women born since 1945, a new study shows. Alcohol use and dependence appear to have remained stable for men, while young Americans report having more lifetime alcohol problems than older Americans, despite having had less time to develop issues….

Continue reading

Binge Drinking Puts the Brain, and Life Itself, at Risk

Nearly half of students at four-year colleges do it regularly (and, it’s not sex). Rather, it’s binge drinking — downing five or more alcoholic drinks at a sitting. “People have a hard time identifying alcohol as a drug,” said Jenny Hwang, associate dean of students and director of the counseling center at Stony Brook University….

Continue reading

How Heroin Treatment Centers Help You Recover

Anyone who’s battled a heroin addiction well knows how hard this drug can be on the body. While the “highs” from heroin may feel great, the lows can be equally painful. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in 2011, as many as 4.2 million Americans reported having used heroin on at least one….

Continue reading

Aripiprazole may be effective for alcohol addiction

A drug used to treat the symptoms of psychosis in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may also be a useful medication for individuals who are addicted to alcohol, findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research suggest. Aripiprazole, sold in the U.S. under the trade name Abilify, is an atypical antipsychotic that increases the….

Continue reading

Heroin-assisted treatment safe and effective: study

A University of B.C. epidemiologist says there is now evidence to support a heroin-assisted addictions therapy clinic in Vancouver. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative, or NAOMI, study was a Vancouver and Montreal-based clinical trial assessing how patients respond to heroin, methadone and other opiate treatment. The three-year study treated 251 of the most chronically….

Continue reading