A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Booze overtaking drugs as teen addiction problem

Alcohol is increasingly becoming the drug of choice for young people, with a 10 per cent rise of the number of under-18s seeking addiction advice over the past year, new figures show.

Angela Slaven, director of youth services at Kent County Council, said while the number of people seeking help for under-age drinking were up, those experiencing problems with cannabis was down 26 per cent.

Young people getting help for addiction to ‘other substances’ such as ecstasy, heroin and cocaine fell by 47 per cent.

The figures came from the Kent Drug and Alcohol Action Team (KDAAT), of which Ms Slaven is also director, and are for the period 2007-08 and 2008-09.

“There are a whole range of issues around alcohol,” she said. “It is easy to access and cheap – you can go into a supermarket and buy vodka for £7.

“I think the principal driver is cheapness and there is evidence to suggest that it is to do with cultural and social norms.

“Parents supply 17-year-olds and give their children alcohol perhaps in the belief it is a way of managing it but it could be exacerbating it.”

KDAAT’s figures take into account a range of support mechanisms from a young person talking to a teacher or youth worker about concerns over drug and alcohol addiction through to treatment such as professional counselling and at the top tier detox programmes.

As part of a BBC investigation this week, it was revealed that the number of young people seeking treatment for drug and alcohol problems had increased 12 per cent over two years.

Figures obtained by the broadcaster from the National Treatment Agency showed that 44 per cent more under-25s had problems with drugs like cannabis and cocaine but heroin and crack addiction had gone down.

“Kent is different to the national picture and for whatever reason the drug of choice among young people is alcohol,” Ms Slaven said.

“It could be that young people do not consider alcohol to be a drug because part of our normal society.”

Ms Slaven was speaking to Kent on Sunday to mark National Tackling Drugs Week, which ran from this Monday to Friday, she said while KDAAT was investing in alcohol addiction prevention schemes it had not taken its eyes off issues around drugs.

“There is a gap in 18 to 25s treatment and we are doing work to improve accessibility so that people can seek help with drugs,” she said.

“If people are beginning at 18 to increase their cannabis smoking that is problematic in itself, and if people move towards other class A drugs such as crack cocaine and heroin.

“We are looking at how we shape these services because it is a time when you think you are in control but actually these things creep up on you.”

In Kent, 5, 505 people under-18 accessed KDAAT services in 2007-08, which decreased to 5,007 for the last financial year.

Those referred for alcohol addiction increased from 169 to 192 while cannabis referrals went down from 374 to 276. But cannabis remains the drug that the most young people are seeking help for. Young people seeking help for other substance abuse such as ecstasy and class As like heroin decreased sharply from 71 to 37.

Cannabis was the prevailing drug in young men aged between 16 and 24, Ms Slaven said. She said heroin was most abused by the 35 to 44 age group.

Asked if this showed young people were turning away from it, she said: “Huge amounts of work have been done with harm reduction and prevention issues around blood born viruses and sharing needles these messages are getting across.”

In Kent she said crack addiction was most prevalent in the Medway Towns, she added: “It has not yet spread down into the more rural parts of Kent. Cocaine is associated with more affluence and it could be that they are not presenting to our services.”

source: Canterbury News

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Benefits of Social Support in Drug Treatment Centers

Did you know that your support system can make all the difference when you enter into drug treatment? The social support systems that are integrated into drug treatment programs can have dramatic effects on the success of the overall treatment program, especially for those whose addictions are highly psychological in matter. A strong social support….

Continue reading

Reformed addict tells of his life as an alcoholic

It’s Been two years since a drop of alcohol last passed Neil Kimberlin’s lips. But despite his teetotal lifestyle the 58-year-old openly admits he is still is, and always will be, an alcoholic. At the height of his addiction Neil downed a whole litre of whisky every single day as well as drinking 14 pints….

Continue reading

Prenatal Cocaine Exposure May Compromise Neurocognitive Development During Middle Childhood

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that heavier intrauterine cocaine exposure (IUCE) is associated with mild compromise on selective areas of neurocognitive development during middle childhood. The BUSM study appears in the May issue of Neurotoxicology and Teratology. BUSM researchers evaluated whether the level of IUCE or the interaction between IUCE….

Continue reading

Drugs: an unstoppable tide?

Punitive sentences totalling 85 years, which were passed down last week on three English gang members, are unlikely to stem the tide of transatlantic drug shipments. As he fielded calls last week from people eager to discuss the record prison sentences handed down to four drug smugglers over the €440 million haul of cocaine recovered….

Continue reading

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 800-580-9104Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?