A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Binge drinking starts at five

Regular alcohol consumption can lead to binge drinking among all gender and age groups, a new study suggests.

“What we found is that when people drink more often, they are more likely to drink more, take more drinks, and go to binge drinking,” said Andree Demers of Universite de Montreal, the study’s main researcher.

She classified binge drinking as five drinks or more per occasion.

“Usually you take one or two drinks,” she said yesterday. “If you want to celebrate, you’re going to take two or three or four or five drinks.”

The study was conducted by researchers from the Universite de Montreal and the University of Western Ontario and published in the latest edition of Addiction.

The study established one drink as either five ounces of wine; 1.5 ounces of liquor; 12 ounces of beer or cooler; or three ounces of port, sherry or vermouth.

About 11,000 respondents — 5,743 women and 4,723 men — were asked to report on their alcohol consumption over a year. The data was gathered by the Genacis Canada project, an international collaboration looking at how social and cultural differences can influence drinking habits.

Demers said women tend to drink less than men.

Demers says the study is relevant given other studies that tout the health virtues of a moderate amount of beverages such as red wine.

“With all this publicity of having one glass, there is no problem with this, and drink moderately, we get the idea that we can drink every day and that’s OK,” Demers said.

“Of course that can be OK, but what we are saying is that there is a risk that people will start to drink more often in a heavy way on some occasions.”

Catherine Paradis, also a professor at the Universite de Montreal, pointed out regular drinking builds up tolerance.

“Therefore, daily drinkers will need more than their usual drink or two to make a difference with everyday life and gain that festive feeling. That fosters drinking beyond healthy limits — at least sporadically.

“The safe amount is always the same thing — one or two drinks per day, not more, and no intoxication.”and perhaps weekly — to five drinks or more per occasion.

“And five units is above the recommended limits of healthy drinking.”

source: London Free Press

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Hidden Traumas of the Family Members of an Alcoholic

When a loved one is addicted to alcohol we often like to think that as soon as they get help, complete alcohol treatment and come home everything will just return to normal. It’s nice to believe that things will naturally go back to the way they once were and that alcohol treatment will heal the….

Continue reading

‘Tis the season for an intervention?

intervention program

The upcoming holiday season can be particularly stressful if you’ll be spending time with a loved one addicted to alcohol or other drugs. You might feel conflicted about family celebrations; holiday gatherings are supposed to be happy times, but yours don’t look like what you see on television. Should you ignore your loved one’s addiction….

Continue reading

Charles Lieber, pioneer in alcoholism research

Dr. Charles S. Lieber, who overturned conventional wisdom by demonstrating that alcohol is a toxin that can damage the liver and that alcoholism is a disease that can be treated, died March 1 at his home in Tenafly, N.J. He was 78 and had been battling stomach cancer. Before his work in the 1970s, researchers….

Continue reading

Voices of hope for alcoholics

When I attend meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous, I speak of my “experience, strength and hope.” As an alcoholic in recovery, I carry that message to others as part of the 12-step program I work in AA. This week, I listened to other voices, both younger and older, carry the message, too, from as near as….

Continue reading

Hallucinogen’s Popularity May Thwart Medical Use

With a friend videotaping, 27-year-old Christopher Lenzini of Dallas took a hit of Salvia divinorum, regarded as the world’s most potent hallucinogenic herb, and soon began to imagine, he said, that he was in a boat with little green men. Mr. Lenzini quickly collapsed to the floor and dissolved into convulsive laughter. When he posted….

Continue reading