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Alcohol Treatment Costs

When you or a loved one is addicted to alcohol chances are the cost of alcohol treatment is weighing heavily on your mind. How much will it cost? Who will pay for it? How will I pay for it? Can I afford it? The questions reel through your head and all you can think is that you know you need help! Alcohol treatment is a medical treatment and therefore it is covered by some insurance plans as well as state medical plans but if you don’t have such coverage you still have options to get the medical treatment that you need to overcome this disease. Here’s a look at the cost of alcohol treatment and how to pay for it:

What Alcohol Treatment Costs

The cost of alcohol treatment varies from free to very expensive, depending largely on the type of treatment that you receive. For instance, free alcohol treatment centers provide options that anyone can afford but the treatment that is provided at these facilities is usually very minimal, no frills attached type services. Most alcohol treatment centers that are free or low cost do not offer high end accommodations, alternative treatment options or any extras but when you are low on money and need help they can be a very beneficial option.

Alcohol treatment can become very costly in the even that you choose luxury alcohol treatment or if your alcohol treatment becomes highly medical invasive. For instance, if you require a very long detox phase and you are provided with a lot of medications then the cost for alcohol treatment could increase significantly. Every alcohol treatment center charges different fees for included and non included services so it’s important that you ask the center prior to entering what the fees will be and what services will be included for a flat cost as well as what fees would be required for additional services.

Paying for Alcohol Treatment

There are a variety of options available to help you pay for alcohol treatment. Most insurance coverages will provide some type of help for the payment of alcohol treatment. Many states require insurance companies to provide coverage at least for alcohol detox and some provide additional coverage options. If you have insurance coverage for alcohol treatment, consider asking the insurance company about which alcohol treatment centers are covered by your plan as well as what services are covered. If you don’t have insurance or your insurer does not provide coverage for alcohol detox consider some of the other payment options that are available to you including sliding fee structure, financing and low cost outpatient options.

Sliding fee structures allow you to pay a percentage of the cost of alcohol treatment based on your income. If you have a strong ability to pay you will pay significantly more for the same treatment that somebody with a minimal ability to pay would. This type of fee structure makes paying the cost of alcohol treatment easier on those who have a job but cannot afford to pay 100% of the cost of alcohol treatment. Many alcohol treatment centers offer sliding fee scales so don’t hesitate to ask about such affordable options.

Finally, some alcohol treatment centers will finance your treatment if you can prove credit worthiness. If you are not credit worthy as deemed by the alcohol treatment center, consider searching for a low cost outpatient alcohol treatment program that you can afford. Either way, you have options regardless of the cost of alcohol treatment or your income.

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