A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

Alcohol-free weekend raises awareness

Those who decide to give up alcohol this Easter weekend won’t necessarily be doing so because of holiday tradition.

For those involved in the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, it will represent an effort to raise awareness of alcohol disease.

The three-day challenge, always the first weekend of April, kicks off the 23rd annual NCADD Alcohol Awareness Month.

Despite the proliferation of other problems, some local people think it’s still important to talk about alcohol.

“I think it gets overlooked,” said Shavonne Andrews of Tahlequah. “They think if they just have a couple of beers when they get off work, then it’s not a big deal.”

Andrews relates a personal experience that taught her to stay away from it.

“My dad would come home and always have his beer,” she said. “He never got violent, but he was moody a lot.”

He eventually died from liver disease.

“His body just couldn’t take it,” she said.

According to the NCADD website, the awareness month began as a way of reaching the public with information about the disease. The idea was to let peope know it’s treatable, not a moral failing – and that it is possible for alcoholics to recover.

April Goetcher knows there’s a stigma attached to someone who goes to Alcoholics Anonymous.

“My brother has problems, and he started going to AA and the other ones,” she said. “I never thought about it being a big deal until he asked me to go with him.”

Goetcher felt immediate guilt when she told him “no.”

“I was worried about someone seeing me there, I guess,” she said. “It’s stupid now. He still struggles with it, and I go with him to some of his meetings. And no matter who you are surprised to see there, it’s all supposed to be confidential.”

Dr. Nicholas Pace, founder Pace Health Services in New York, said there are some danger signs associated with relapse of recovering alcoholics, according to www.ncadd.com.

“It when an alcoholic or addict says he or she doesn’t need to go to any more self-help meetings, you know there is going to be trouble ahead,” he said.

Pace suggests friends and family take time to understand that addiction is a disease.

“You should try your hardest not to be moralistic when dealing with them,” he said.

Instead of making threats or getting angry, Pace suggests expressing concern.

“Urge them to talk to you,” he said.

The organization said those taking the challenge who experience difficulty or discomfort in the 72 hours should contact local affiliates, or Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon to learn more about alcoholism and its early symptoms, according to www.ncadd.com.

The NCADD is the nation’s oldest advocacy health program dealing exclusively with alcoholism and drug dependence. The group was founded in 1944 by Marty Mann, the first woman to achieve long-term sobriety in AA, according to the website.

source: http://tahlequahdailypress.com

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Participants: County Alcohol treatment program works

Todd Hunter has been sober for two-and-a-half years. The 47-year-old Appleton man credits his sobriety in part to an alcohol program that will soon be available to convicted drunk drivers across the state. After Hunter was convicted of his third drunken driving offense in 2007, his attorney suggested he participate in the Safe Streets Treatment….

Continue reading

Homeless alcoholism drains city

The Biggest Little City gained notoriety in a 2006 edition of the New Yorker after two Reno police officers estimated that ignoring one of the city’s homeless chronic alcoholics cost the city more than $1 million over the years. Malcolm Gladwell’s story quoted Reno police officers Patrick O’Bryan and Steve Johns explaining that Murray Barr,….

Continue reading

The brain maintains language skills in spite of alcohol damage by drawing from other regions

Researchers know that alcoholism can damage the brain’s frontal lobes and cerebellum, regions involved in language processing. Nonetheless, alcoholics’ language skills appear to be relatively spared from alcohol’s damaging effects. New findings suggest the brain maintains language skills by drawing upon other systems that would normally be used to perform other tasks simultaneously. Prior neuroimaging….

Continue reading

Binge drinking mums

Almost a thousand Scots babies are suffering from potentially fatal brain and organ damage because mothers are drinking too much in the early stages of pregnancy, research has revealed. Many more babies in Scotland may also face a lifetime suffering from malformations or learning difficulties. Researchers say the effects of excessive drinking on unborn babies….

Continue reading

The AbuseCheck Hair Alcohol Test

From a Small Sample of Hair, This Test Can Distinguish Non-Drinkers from Moderate and Abusive Drinkers Alcoholism poses serious health issues with major socio-economic consequences to society. Four major areas of concern are public transportation, child custody rights, measuring underage drinking, and tools for monitoring rehabilitation. The Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991 requires….

Continue reading