A National Directory of Drug Treatment Centers and Alcohol Treatment Centers, Therapists and Specialists. A free, simple directory providing assistance and guidance for those seeking help regarding alcohol addiction, drug addiction, dependency and many other conditions that affect the mind, body and soul.
Call 800-580-9104 to speak with an alcohol or drug abuse counselor.

After combat, citizen soldiers turning to alcohol

National Guard and Reserve combat troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are more likely to develop drinking problems than active-duty soldiers, a new military study suggests.

The authors speculate that inadequate preparation for the stress of combat and reduced access to support services at home might be to blame.

The study, appearing in today’s Journal of the American Medical Association, is the first to compare Iraq and Afghanistan veterans’ alcohol problems before and after deployment.

It should help guide planning for future prevention and treatment programs, said study co-author Dr. Edward Boyko, who works for the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System.

The research is one of the first major studies to emerge from the Pentagon’s landmark “Millennium” study, launched in 2001 because of concerns about possible health effects from the first Gulf War. It includes tens of thousands of military personnel and is designed to evaluate the long-term health effects of military service.

In the alcohol study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 80,000 military personnel, including more than 11,000 who were sent to Iraq and Afghanistan. They looked at whether deployment and combat exposure were linked with new alcohol problems such as binge drinking.

They found that more than 600 combat troops who reported no binge drinking at the start of the study developed the problem after deployment and combat exposure. That accounted for about 26 percent of the estimated 2,400 military personnel exposed to combat who did not report binge drinking at the start of the study.

New patterns of regular heavy drinking and alcohol problems, such as missing work because of drinking, occurred more often in guard and reserve troops who experienced combat. Their risk of developing new drinking problems, compared to guardsmen and reservists who weren’t deployed, was about 60 percent higher.

Alcohol abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression make up an “unholy trinity” that haunts some combat soldiers, said psychologist William Schlenger of the consulting firm Abt Associates Inc. in Durham, N.C. He was a principal investigator of the influential National Vietnam Veterans’ Readjustment Study but was not involved in the new research.
_____
source: Journal Gazette, http://www.journalgazette.net

More Treatment & Detox Articles

Boozing mothers affect babies’ response to pain: Study

Prenatal exposure to alcohol dulls the pain response in babies, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. The research, which will be published in the April issue of the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, showed that even healthy babies whose mothers drank while they were pregnant were affected by the….

Continue reading

Expert warns teens and alcohol don’t mix

Tasmanian parents are being warned against allowing their children to drink alcohol. The warning follows a national health insurers’ survey of 1200 adults earlier this year. More than half the Tasmanians interviewed thought it was acceptable for 15 to 17-year-olds to drink at home supervised by their parents. The Director of the Brain and Mind….

Continue reading

Choosing the Right Alcohol Treatment Center

Many different factors must be taken into consideration when choosing the right alcohol treatment center. Everyone has different needs and everyone deals with their addiction in a different manner. The longer an addict uses alcohol and the more intense the addiction is typically requires the alcohol treatment to be more intense. Alcohol treatment centers offer….

Continue reading

Parents, administrators fight binge drinking

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools have a new program to tackle binge drinking in teens, which seems to start before they head to college, according to a national survey. The survey by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said 18 percent of 12 to 20-year-olds are binge drinkers. The school system is using federal money for….

Continue reading