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The Painful Truth about Heroin Detox

Thousands of heroin uses claim that they don’t get treatment for their addiction simply because they are too afraid of having to go through withdrawal during detox. In fact, many would rather use heroin and remain addicted to this deadly drug than actually deal with the pain and discomforts that come during withdrawal. The truth is, heroin detox isn’t fun, it isn’t pretty and it isn’t easy—but it is necessary!

Many treatment programs do not allow adequate time for heroin detox to be completed and for treatment to take place. In fact, studies show that most heroin users who do relapse will do so either immediately following detox or immediately following a shorter duration treatment program. In order for heroin detox to be effective and for treatment for the addiction to cause significant behavioral change, the user must have at least 2 weeks in detox followed by at least 90 days in treatment.

Did you know that detox can be a much easier, much simpler process when it takes place in a qualified heroin treatment center? Today’s heroin detox programs are much easier than they once were. Many include a combination of pain relieving, withdrawal symptom alleviating and craving blocking drugs medications such as Suboxone, methadone or other medications to help ease the withdrawal process. The truth is, addicts who are in fear of detox really have no reason to fear it now that treatment centers are able to provide medications, alternative therapy and a range of medical intervention techniques to help.

Heroin Detox Program

Heroin detox is the first step to a successful recovery.

In most cases, heroin detox will take place over about 7 days but in more severe cases the process can take about two weeks. The recommended timeline is to take 2 weeks for detox followed by a full 90 day or longer treatment program. It’s important that those who do detox from heroin roll directly into a quality treatment program without any time lapse in between as most users will relapse immediately following detox. Keep in mind that detox is just the beginning and in order for long-term recovery to take place, psychiatric counseling and behavioral change must also take place.

What can you Do to Convince a Loved one to Go Into Detox?

If you have a loved one who is addicted to heroin and needs help, there are some things you can do to help convince them that detox is not as painful and difficult as they may think. The trust of the matter is, addiction is experienced by the user on a physical, spiritual, emotional and psychological level which means that in order to convince them that detox is the right thing for them, you have to really hit home personally.

Talk with your loved one about the perceived pain and discomforts that cause them to refuse detox and address their concerns in a loving and caring manner. Make sure that he or she knows that heroin detox is not what it once was and that in most cases the process goes rather smoothly, is not highly painful when medications are used and only takes about a week.

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